Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

CT-based and morphological comparison of glenoid inclination and version angles and mineralisation distribution in human body donors


Serrano, Nabil; Kissling, Marc; Krafft, Hannah; Link, Karl; Ullrich, Oliver; Buck, Florian M; Mathews, Sandra; Serowy, Steffen; Gascho, Dominic; Grüninger, Patrick; Fornaciari, Paolo; Bouaicha, Samy; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Rühli, Frank-Jakobus; Eppler, Elisabeth (2021). CT-based and morphological comparison of glenoid inclination and version angles and mineralisation distribution in human body donors. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 22:849.

Abstract

Background: For optimal prosthetic anchoring in omarthritis surgery, a differentiated knowledge on the mineralisation distribution of the glenoid is important. However, database on the mineralisation of diseased joints and potential relations with glenoid angles is limited.

Methods: Shoulder specimens from ten female and nine male body donors with an average age of 81.5 years were investigated. Using 3D-CT-multiplanar reconstruction, glenoid inclination and retroversion angles were measured, and osteoarthritis signs graded. Computed Tomography-Osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) is an established method to determine the subchondral bone plate mineralisation, which has been demonstrated to serve as marker for the long-term loading history of joints. Based on mineralisation distribution mappings of healthy shoulder specimens, physiological and different CT-OAM patterns were compared with glenoid angles.

Results: Osteoarthritis grades were 0-I in 52.6% of the 3D-CT-scans, grades II-III in 34.3%, and grade IV in 13.2%, with in females twice as frequently (45%) higher grades (III, IV) than in males (22%, III). The average inclination angle was 8.4°. In glenoids with inclination ≤10°, mineralisation was predominantly centrally distributed and tended to shift more cranially when the inclination raised to > 10°. The average retroversion angle was - 5.2°. A dorsally enhanced mineralisation distribution was found in glenoids with versions from - 15.9° to + 1.7°. A predominantly centrally distributed mineralisation was accompanied by a narrower range of retroversion angles between - 10° to - 0.4°.

Conclusions: This study is one of the first to combine CT-based analyses of glenoid angles and mineralisation distribution in an elderly population. The data set is limited to 19 individuals, however, indicates that superior inclination between 0° and 10°-15°, and dorsal version ranging between - 9° to - 3° may be predominantly associated with anterior and central mineralisation patterns previously classified as physiological for the shoulder joint. The current basic research findings may serve as basic data set for future studies addressing the glenoid geometry for treatment planning in omarthritis.

Keywords: 3D-CT; Bone mineralization; CT-OAM; Glenoid anteversion; Glenoid retroversion; Inclination angle; Shoulder joint.

Abstract

Background: For optimal prosthetic anchoring in omarthritis surgery, a differentiated knowledge on the mineralisation distribution of the glenoid is important. However, database on the mineralisation of diseased joints and potential relations with glenoid angles is limited.

Methods: Shoulder specimens from ten female and nine male body donors with an average age of 81.5 years were investigated. Using 3D-CT-multiplanar reconstruction, glenoid inclination and retroversion angles were measured, and osteoarthritis signs graded. Computed Tomography-Osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) is an established method to determine the subchondral bone plate mineralisation, which has been demonstrated to serve as marker for the long-term loading history of joints. Based on mineralisation distribution mappings of healthy shoulder specimens, physiological and different CT-OAM patterns were compared with glenoid angles.

Results: Osteoarthritis grades were 0-I in 52.6% of the 3D-CT-scans, grades II-III in 34.3%, and grade IV in 13.2%, with in females twice as frequently (45%) higher grades (III, IV) than in males (22%, III). The average inclination angle was 8.4°. In glenoids with inclination ≤10°, mineralisation was predominantly centrally distributed and tended to shift more cranially when the inclination raised to > 10°. The average retroversion angle was - 5.2°. A dorsally enhanced mineralisation distribution was found in glenoids with versions from - 15.9° to + 1.7°. A predominantly centrally distributed mineralisation was accompanied by a narrower range of retroversion angles between - 10° to - 0.4°.

Conclusions: This study is one of the first to combine CT-based analyses of glenoid angles and mineralisation distribution in an elderly population. The data set is limited to 19 individuals, however, indicates that superior inclination between 0° and 10°-15°, and dorsal version ranging between - 9° to - 3° may be predominantly associated with anterior and central mineralisation patterns previously classified as physiological for the shoulder joint. The current basic research findings may serve as basic data set for future studies addressing the glenoid geometry for treatment planning in omarthritis.

Keywords: 3D-CT; Bone mineralization; CT-OAM; Glenoid anteversion; Glenoid retroversion; Inclination angle; Shoulder joint.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
3 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

15 downloads since deposited on 18 Oct 2021
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Legal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Rheumatology
Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords:Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Rheumatology
Language:English
Date:1 December 2021
Deposited On:18 Oct 2021 14:36
Last Modified:25 Jun 2024 01:45
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2474
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-021-04660-4
PubMed ID:34610804
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)