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Assessing the long-term potential of fiber reinforced polymer composites for sustainable marine construction


Kappenthuler, Steve; Seeger, Stefan (2021). Assessing the long-term potential of fiber reinforced polymer composites for sustainable marine construction. Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy, 7(2):129-144.

Abstract

Fiber reinforced polymer composites (FRPC) have gain rapid interest as light-weight and corrosion-resistant materials for various applications in marine infrastructure. Despite their advantages, FRPCs are still susceptible to other environmental factors present in the marine environment and manufactured mostly from non-renewable materials. This greatly affects the overall economic and environmental sustainability of such components. To determine the long-term suitability of various FRPCs for use in marine environments, this paper provides a holistic comparison of the performance of 16 FRPCs (four fiber types: glass, carbon, natural, basalt; and four polymer resins: epoxy, polyester, vinylester, thermoplastic) not only from a technical, but also from an economic, environmental and resource perspective. The resulting ranking not only assesses each material’s long-term potential, but also provides a detailed overview of individual strengths and weaknesses. Although ranked the lowest of all materials, the partial renewability of the natural fiber composites makes them an interesting material in the longer term. Therefore, we use the framework to evaluate a number of approaches aimed at improving the overall performance of these composites.

Abstract

Fiber reinforced polymer composites (FRPC) have gain rapid interest as light-weight and corrosion-resistant materials for various applications in marine infrastructure. Despite their advantages, FRPCs are still susceptible to other environmental factors present in the marine environment and manufactured mostly from non-renewable materials. This greatly affects the overall economic and environmental sustainability of such components. To determine the long-term suitability of various FRPCs for use in marine environments, this paper provides a holistic comparison of the performance of 16 FRPCs (four fiber types: glass, carbon, natural, basalt; and four polymer resins: epoxy, polyester, vinylester, thermoplastic) not only from a technical, but also from an economic, environmental and resource perspective. The resulting ranking not only assesses each material’s long-term potential, but also provides a detailed overview of individual strengths and weaknesses. Although ranked the lowest of all materials, the partial renewability of the natural fiber composites makes them an interesting material in the longer term. Therefore, we use the framework to evaluate a number of approaches aimed at improving the overall performance of these composites.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
Physical Sciences > Water Science and Technology
Physical Sciences > Energy Engineering and Power Technology
Physical Sciences > Ocean Engineering
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ocean Engineering, Energy Engineering and Power Technology, Water Science and Technology, Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
Language:English
Date:1 May 2021
Deposited On:21 Oct 2021 13:20
Last Modified:25 Apr 2024 01:40
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:2198-6444
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s40722-021-00187-x
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
  • Content: Accepted Version