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Occurrence of Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia felis pmp9 typing in conjunctival and rectal samples of Swiss stray and pet Cats


Bressan, Michelle; Rampazzo, Antonella; Kuratli, Jasmin; Marti, Hanna; Pesch, Theresa; Borel, Nicole (2021). Occurrence of Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia felis pmp9 typing in conjunctival and rectal samples of Swiss stray and pet Cats. Pathogens, 10(8):951.

Abstract

Chlamydia (C.) felis primarily replicates in feline conjunctival epithelial cells and is an important cause of conjunctivitis in cats. Data on C. felis infection rates in stray cats in Switzerland has been missing so far. We performed a qPCR-based Chlamydiaceae-screening on 565 conjunctival and 387 rectal samples from 309 stray and 86 pet cats followed by Chlamydia species identification and C. felis typing using the gene pmp9, which encodes a polymorphic membrane protein. Overall, 19.1% of the stray and 11.6% of the pet cats were Chlamydiaceae-positive with significantly higher rates in cats displaying signs of conjunctivitis (37.1%) compared to healthy animals (6.9%). Rectal shedding of Chlamydiaceae occurred in 25.0% of infected cats and was mostly associated with concurrent ocular positivity (87.5%). In 92.2% of positive conjunctival and rectal samples, the Chlamydia species was identified as C. felis and in 2.6% as C. abortus. The C. felis pmp9 gene was very conserved in the sampled population with only one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in one conjunctival sample. In conclusion, C. felis strains are circulating in Swiss cats, are associated with conjunctivitis, have a low pmp9 genetic variability, and are rectally shed in about 16% of positive cases.

Abstract

Chlamydia (C.) felis primarily replicates in feline conjunctival epithelial cells and is an important cause of conjunctivitis in cats. Data on C. felis infection rates in stray cats in Switzerland has been missing so far. We performed a qPCR-based Chlamydiaceae-screening on 565 conjunctival and 387 rectal samples from 309 stray and 86 pet cats followed by Chlamydia species identification and C. felis typing using the gene pmp9, which encodes a polymorphic membrane protein. Overall, 19.1% of the stray and 11.6% of the pet cats were Chlamydiaceae-positive with significantly higher rates in cats displaying signs of conjunctivitis (37.1%) compared to healthy animals (6.9%). Rectal shedding of Chlamydiaceae occurred in 25.0% of infected cats and was mostly associated with concurrent ocular positivity (87.5%). In 92.2% of positive conjunctival and rectal samples, the Chlamydia species was identified as C. felis and in 2.6% as C. abortus. The C. felis pmp9 gene was very conserved in the sampled population with only one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in one conjunctival sample. In conclusion, C. felis strains are circulating in Swiss cats, are associated with conjunctivitis, have a low pmp9 genetic variability, and are rectally shed in about 16% of positive cases.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Center for Clinical Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Immunology and Allergy
Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > General Immunology and Microbiology
Health Sciences > Microbiology (medical)
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Uncontrolled Keywords:Infectious Diseases, Microbiology (medical), General Immunology and Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Immunology and Allergy
Language:English
Date:28 July 2021
Deposited On:10 Dec 2021 09:24
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:44
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2076-0817
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080951
Related URLs:https://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/207971/
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)