Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies ( ESSCA ): Characteristics of patients patch tested and diagnosed with irritant contact dermatitis


Loman, Laura; Uter, Wolfgang; Armario‐Hita, José C; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; et al (2021). European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies ( ESSCA ): Characteristics of patients patch tested and diagnosed with irritant contact dermatitis. Contact Dermatitis, 85(2):186-197.

Abstract

Background
Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is caused by the acute locally toxic effect of a strong irritant, or the cumulative exposure to various weaker physical and/or chemical irritants.

Objectives
To describe the characteristics of patients with ICD in the population patch tested in the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA; www.essca-dc.org) database.

Methods
Data collected by the ESSCA in consecutively patch tested patients from January 2009 to December 2018 were analyzed.

Results
Of the 68 072 patients, 8702 were diagnosed with ICD (without concomitant allergic contact dermatitis [ACD]). Hand and face were the most reported anatomical sites, and 45.7% of the ICD was occupational ICD (OICD). The highest proportions of OICD were found in metal turners, bakers, pastry cooks, and confectionery makers. Among patients diagnosed with ICD, 45% were found sensitized with no relevance for the current disease.

Conclusions
The hands were mainly involved in OICD also in the subgroup of patients with contact dermatitis, in whom relevant contact sensitization had been ruled out, emphasizing the need for limiting irritant exposures. However, in difficult-to-treat contact dermatitis, unrecognized contact allergy, or unrecognized clinical relevance of identified allergies owing to incomplete or wrong product ingredient information must always be considered.

Abstract

Background
Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is caused by the acute locally toxic effect of a strong irritant, or the cumulative exposure to various weaker physical and/or chemical irritants.

Objectives
To describe the characteristics of patients with ICD in the population patch tested in the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA; www.essca-dc.org) database.

Methods
Data collected by the ESSCA in consecutively patch tested patients from January 2009 to December 2018 were analyzed.

Results
Of the 68 072 patients, 8702 were diagnosed with ICD (without concomitant allergic contact dermatitis [ACD]). Hand and face were the most reported anatomical sites, and 45.7% of the ICD was occupational ICD (OICD). The highest proportions of OICD were found in metal turners, bakers, pastry cooks, and confectionery makers. Among patients diagnosed with ICD, 45% were found sensitized with no relevance for the current disease.

Conclusions
The hands were mainly involved in OICD also in the subgroup of patients with contact dermatitis, in whom relevant contact sensitization had been ruled out, emphasizing the need for limiting irritant exposures. However, in difficult-to-treat contact dermatitis, unrecognized contact allergy, or unrecognized clinical relevance of identified allergies owing to incomplete or wrong product ingredient information must always be considered.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
4 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

22 downloads since deposited on 26 Nov 2021
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Contributors:ESSCA Working Group
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Immunology and Allergy
Health Sciences > Dermatology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Dermatology, Immunology and Allergy
Language:English
Date:1 August 2021
Deposited On:26 Nov 2021 10:23
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:44
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0105-1873
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/cod.13833
PubMed ID:33729576
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)