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Evaluation of the Post-Training Hypotensor Effect in Paralympic and Conventional Powerlifting


Abstract

High blood pressure (HBP) has been associated with several complications and causes of death. The objective of the study was to analyze the hemodynamic responses in Paralympic bench press powerlifting (PP) and conventional powerlifting (CP) before and after training and up to 60 minutes (min) after training. Ten PP and 10 CP athletes performed five sets of five repetition maximal bench press exercises, and we evaluated systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure (SBP, DBP, and MBP, respectively), heart rate (HR), heart pressure product (HPP), and myocardial oxygen volume (MVO2). The SBP increased after training (p < 0.001), and there were differences in the post training and 30, 40, and 60 min later (p = 0.021), between 10 and 40 min after training (p = 0.031, η2p = 0.570), and between CP and PP (p =0.028, η2p = 0.570). In the MBP, there were differences between before and after (p = 0.016) and 40 min later (p = 0.040, η2p = 0.309). In the HR, there was a difference between before and after, and 5 and 10 min later (p = 0.002), and between after and 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min later (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.767). In HPP and MVO2, there were differences between before and after (p = 0.006), and between after and 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min later (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.816). In CP and PP, there is no risk of hemodynamic overload to athletes, considering the results of the HPP, and training promotes a moderate hypotensive effect, with blood pressure adaptation after and 60 min after exercise.

Abstract

High blood pressure (HBP) has been associated with several complications and causes of death. The objective of the study was to analyze the hemodynamic responses in Paralympic bench press powerlifting (PP) and conventional powerlifting (CP) before and after training and up to 60 minutes (min) after training. Ten PP and 10 CP athletes performed five sets of five repetition maximal bench press exercises, and we evaluated systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure (SBP, DBP, and MBP, respectively), heart rate (HR), heart pressure product (HPP), and myocardial oxygen volume (MVO2). The SBP increased after training (p < 0.001), and there were differences in the post training and 30, 40, and 60 min later (p = 0.021), between 10 and 40 min after training (p = 0.031, η2p = 0.570), and between CP and PP (p =0.028, η2p = 0.570). In the MBP, there were differences between before and after (p = 0.016) and 40 min later (p = 0.040, η2p = 0.309). In the HR, there was a difference between before and after, and 5 and 10 min later (p = 0.002), and between after and 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min later (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.767). In HPP and MVO2, there were differences between before and after (p = 0.006), and between after and 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min later (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.816). In CP and PP, there is no risk of hemodynamic overload to athletes, considering the results of the HPP, and training promotes a moderate hypotensive effect, with blood pressure adaptation after and 60 min after exercise.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Anatomy
Health Sciences > Rheumatology
Health Sciences > Histology
Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Health Sciences > Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Histology, Rheumatology, Anatomy
Language:English
Date:1 November 2021
Deposited On:01 Dec 2021 07:54
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:44
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2411-5142
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk6040092
PubMed ID:34842735
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)