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Neural correlates of sex differences in communicative gestures and speech comprehension: A preliminary study


Manfredi, Mirella; Boggio, Paulo Sergio (2021). Neural correlates of sex differences in communicative gestures and speech comprehension: A preliminary study. Social Neuroscience, 16(6):653-667.

Abstract

The goal of this study was to investigate whether the semantic processing of the audiovisual combination of communicative gestures with speech differs between men and women. We recorded event-related brain potentials in women and men during the presentation of communicative gestures that were either congruent or incongruent with the speech.Our results showed that incongruent gestures elicited an N400 effect over frontal sites compared to congruent ones in both groups. Moreover, the females showed an earlier N2 response to incongruent stimuli than congruent ones, while larger sustained negativity and late positivity in response to incongruent stimuli was observed only in males. These results suggest that women rapidly recognize and process audiovisual combinations of communicative gestures and speech (as early as 300 ms) whereas men analyze them at the later stages of the process.

Abstract

The goal of this study was to investigate whether the semantic processing of the audiovisual combination of communicative gestures with speech differs between men and women. We recorded event-related brain potentials in women and men during the presentation of communicative gestures that were either congruent or incongruent with the speech.Our results showed that incongruent gestures elicited an N400 effect over frontal sites compared to congruent ones in both groups. Moreover, the females showed an earlier N2 response to incongruent stimuli than congruent ones, while larger sustained negativity and late positivity in response to incongruent stimuli was observed only in males. These results suggest that women rapidly recognize and process audiovisual combinations of communicative gestures and speech (as early as 300 ms) whereas men analyze them at the later stages of the process.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Social Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Development
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:2 November 2021
Deposited On:01 Dec 2021 13:42
Last Modified:26 Apr 2024 01:37
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1747-0919
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17470919.2021.1997800
PubMed ID:34697990
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