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Macrowear effects of external quartz abrasives of different size and concentration in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)


Martin, Louise F; Ackermans, Nicole L; Richter, Henning; Kircher, Patrick R; Hummel, Jürgen; Codron, Daryl; Clauss, Marcus; Hatt, Jean-Michel (2022). Macrowear effects of external quartz abrasives of different size and concentration in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution, 338(8):586-597.

Abstract

External quartz abrasives are one of the driving forces of macrowear in herbivorous animals. We tested to what extent different sizes and concentrations influence their effect on tooth wear. We fed seven pelleted diets varying only in quartz concentration (0%, 4%, and 8%) and size (fine silt: ∼4 μm, coarse silt: ∼50 μm, fine sand: ∼130 μm) to rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, n = 16) for 2 weeks each in a randomized serial experiment. Measurements to quantify wear and growth of incisors and the mandibular first cheek tooth, as well as heights of all other cheek teeth, were performed using calipers, endoscopic examination, and computed tomography scans before and after each feeding period. Tooth growth showed a compensatory correlation with wear. Absolute tooth height (ATH) and relative tooth height (RTH); relative to the 0% quartz "control" diet) was generally lower on the higher concentration and the larger size of abrasives. The effect was more pronounced on the maxillary teeth, on specific tooth positions and the right jaw side. When offered the choice between different sizes of abrasives, the rabbits favored the silt diets over the control and the fine sand diet; in a second choice experiment with different diets, they selected a pelleted diet with coarse-grained sand, however. This study confirms the dose- and size-dependent wear effects of external abrasives, and that hypselodont teeth show compensatory growth. The avoidance of wear did not seem a priority for animals with hypselodont teeth, since the rabbits did not avoid diets inducing a certain degree of wear.

Abstract

External quartz abrasives are one of the driving forces of macrowear in herbivorous animals. We tested to what extent different sizes and concentrations influence their effect on tooth wear. We fed seven pelleted diets varying only in quartz concentration (0%, 4%, and 8%) and size (fine silt: ∼4 μm, coarse silt: ∼50 μm, fine sand: ∼130 μm) to rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, n = 16) for 2 weeks each in a randomized serial experiment. Measurements to quantify wear and growth of incisors and the mandibular first cheek tooth, as well as heights of all other cheek teeth, were performed using calipers, endoscopic examination, and computed tomography scans before and after each feeding period. Tooth growth showed a compensatory correlation with wear. Absolute tooth height (ATH) and relative tooth height (RTH); relative to the 0% quartz "control" diet) was generally lower on the higher concentration and the larger size of abrasives. The effect was more pronounced on the maxillary teeth, on specific tooth positions and the right jaw side. When offered the choice between different sizes of abrasives, the rabbits favored the silt diets over the control and the fine sand diet; in a second choice experiment with different diets, they selected a pelleted diet with coarse-grained sand, however. This study confirms the dose- and size-dependent wear effects of external abrasives, and that hypselodont teeth show compensatory growth. The avoidance of wear did not seem a priority for animals with hypselodont teeth, since the rabbits did not avoid diets inducing a certain degree of wear.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Clinical Diagnostics and Services
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Life Sciences > Molecular Medicine
Life Sciences > Animal Science and Zoology
Life Sciences > Genetics
Life Sciences > Developmental Biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Developmental Biology, Genetics, Animal Science and Zoology, Molecular Medicine, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 December 2022
Deposited On:03 Dec 2021 08:50
Last Modified:27 Mar 2024 02:58
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1552-5007
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jez.b.23104
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)