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Verifying the placement and length of feeding tubes in canine and feline neonates


Furthner, Etienne; Kowalewski, Mariusz P; Torgerson, Paul; Reichler, Iris M (2021). Verifying the placement and length of feeding tubes in canine and feline neonates. BMC Veterinary Research, 17(1):208.

Abstract

Background: Tube feeding is a common procedure in neonatology. In humans, tube misplacement reportedly occurs in up to 59% of all cases and may lead to perforation in 1.1% of preterm intubated neonates. While numerous studies on optimal tube placement have been performed in human neonates, current recommendations on tube feeding in canine and feline neonatology are based, at best, on studies performed in adult animals. Herein, we aimed to test ultrasonography as a tool to verify tube placement in puppies and kittens and to compare different anatomical predictive markers used in human, canine and feline neonates.
Results: The predictive tube length when held bent between the last rib and the mouth may induce trauma compared to when held straight. A strong positive linear correlation was observed between birthweight and gastric cardia localization. Ultrasonography findings were similar to coeliotomy findings. Stomach volume was less than 2 mL per 100 g in the less-than-one-day-old studied puppies (n = 25) and kittens (n = 28).
Conclusions: A weight-based equation was calculated to help predict appropriate tube placement. Ultrasonography can be used to control gastric tube placement, and neonates less than one-day-old have a smaller stomach capacity. Further studies are required to evaluate whether more-than-one-day-old puppies follow the same linear correlation with their weight. Further in vivo studies are warranted to determine the gold standard procedure for tube feeding in neonatal puppies and kittens.

Abstract

Background: Tube feeding is a common procedure in neonatology. In humans, tube misplacement reportedly occurs in up to 59% of all cases and may lead to perforation in 1.1% of preterm intubated neonates. While numerous studies on optimal tube placement have been performed in human neonates, current recommendations on tube feeding in canine and feline neonatology are based, at best, on studies performed in adult animals. Herein, we aimed to test ultrasonography as a tool to verify tube placement in puppies and kittens and to compare different anatomical predictive markers used in human, canine and feline neonates.
Results: The predictive tube length when held bent between the last rib and the mouth may induce trauma compared to when held straight. A strong positive linear correlation was observed between birthweight and gastric cardia localization. Ultrasonography findings were similar to coeliotomy findings. Stomach volume was less than 2 mL per 100 g in the less-than-one-day-old studied puppies (n = 25) and kittens (n = 28).
Conclusions: A weight-based equation was calculated to help predict appropriate tube placement. Ultrasonography can be used to control gastric tube placement, and neonates less than one-day-old have a smaller stomach capacity. Further studies are required to evaluate whether more-than-one-day-old puppies follow the same linear correlation with their weight. Further in vivo studies are warranted to determine the gold standard procedure for tube feeding in neonatal puppies and kittens.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Veterinary Anatomy
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Veterinary, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 December 2021
Deposited On:25 Dec 2021 11:49
Last Modified:25 Feb 2024 02:51
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1746-6148
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-021-02909-7
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)