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Does continuity in nursing staff matter? A pilot study on correlation of central line-associated bloodstream infections and employee turnover


Scheier, Thomas; Kuster, Stefan P; Dunic, Mesida; Falk, Christian; Sax, Hugo; Schreiber, Peter W (2021). Does continuity in nursing staff matter? A pilot study on correlation of central line-associated bloodstream infections and employee turnover. Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, 10:90.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Understaffing has been previously reported as a risk factor for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). No previous study addressed the question whether fluctuations in staffing have an impact on CLABSI incidence. We analyzed prospectively collected CLABSI surveillance data and data on employee turnover of health care workers (HCW) to address this research question.

METHODS

In January 2016, a semiautomatic surveillance system for CLABSI was implemented at the University Hospital Zurich, a 940 bed tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. Monthly incidence rates (CLABSI/1000 catheter days) were calculated and correlations with human resources management-derived data on employee turnover of HCWs (defined as number of leaving HCWs per month divided by the number of employed HCWs) investigated.

RESULTS

Over a period of 24 months, we detected on the hospital level a positive correlation of CLABSI incidence rates and turnover of nursing personnel (Spearman rank correlation, r = 0.467, P = 0.022). In more detailed analyses on the professional training of nursing personnel, a correlation of CLABSI incidence rates and licensed practical nurses (Spearman rank correlation, r = 0.26, P = 0.038) or registered nurses (r = 0.471, P = 0.021) was found. Physician turnover did not correlate with CLABSI incidence (Spearman rank correlation, r =  -0.058, P = 0.787).

CONCLUSIONS

Prospectively determined CLABSI incidence correlated positively with the degree of turnover of nurses overall and nurses with advanced training, but not with the turnover of physicians. Efforts to maintain continuity in nursing staff might be helpful for sustained reduction in CLABSI rates.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Understaffing has been previously reported as a risk factor for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). No previous study addressed the question whether fluctuations in staffing have an impact on CLABSI incidence. We analyzed prospectively collected CLABSI surveillance data and data on employee turnover of health care workers (HCW) to address this research question.

METHODS

In January 2016, a semiautomatic surveillance system for CLABSI was implemented at the University Hospital Zurich, a 940 bed tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. Monthly incidence rates (CLABSI/1000 catheter days) were calculated and correlations with human resources management-derived data on employee turnover of HCWs (defined as number of leaving HCWs per month divided by the number of employed HCWs) investigated.

RESULTS

Over a period of 24 months, we detected on the hospital level a positive correlation of CLABSI incidence rates and turnover of nursing personnel (Spearman rank correlation, r = 0.467, P = 0.022). In more detailed analyses on the professional training of nursing personnel, a correlation of CLABSI incidence rates and licensed practical nurses (Spearman rank correlation, r = 0.26, P = 0.038) or registered nurses (r = 0.471, P = 0.021) was found. Physician turnover did not correlate with CLABSI incidence (Spearman rank correlation, r =  -0.058, P = 0.787).

CONCLUSIONS

Prospectively determined CLABSI incidence correlated positively with the degree of turnover of nurses overall and nurses with advanced training, but not with the turnover of physicians. Efforts to maintain continuity in nursing staff might be helpful for sustained reduction in CLABSI rates.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Health Sciences > Microbiology (medical)
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:6 June 2021
Deposited On:17 Dec 2021 07:13
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:46
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:2047-2994
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s13756-021-00958-z
PubMed ID:34090530
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)