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High-throughput functional characterization of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast


Abstract

Phosphorylation is a critical post-translational modification involved in the regulation of almost all cellular processes. However, fewer than 5% of thousands of recently discovered phosphosites have been functionally annotated. In this study, we devised a chemical genetic approach to study the functional relevance of phosphosites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generated 474 yeast strains with mutations in specific phosphosites that were screened for fitness in 102 conditions, along with a gene deletion library. Of these phosphosites, 42% exhibited growth phenotypes, suggesting that these are more likely functional. We inferred their function based on the similarity of their growth profiles with that of gene deletions and validated a subset by thermal proteome profiling and lipidomics. A high fraction exhibited phenotypes not seen in the corresponding gene deletion, suggestive of a gain-of-function effect. For phosphosites conserved in humans, the severity of the yeast phenotypes is indicative of their human functional relevance. This high-throughput approach allows for functionally characterizing individual phosphosites at scale.

Abstract

Phosphorylation is a critical post-translational modification involved in the regulation of almost all cellular processes. However, fewer than 5% of thousands of recently discovered phosphosites have been functionally annotated. In this study, we devised a chemical genetic approach to study the functional relevance of phosphosites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generated 474 yeast strains with mutations in specific phosphosites that were screened for fitness in 102 conditions, along with a gene deletion library. Of these phosphosites, 42% exhibited growth phenotypes, suggesting that these are more likely functional. We inferred their function based on the similarity of their growth profiles with that of gene deletions and validated a subset by thermal proteome profiling and lipidomics. A high fraction exhibited phenotypes not seen in the corresponding gene deletion, suggestive of a gain-of-function effect. For phosphosites conserved in humans, the severity of the yeast phenotypes is indicative of their human functional relevance. This high-throughput approach allows for functionally characterizing individual phosphosites at scale.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Biotechnology
Physical Sciences > Bioengineering
Life Sciences > Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Life Sciences > Molecular Medicine
Physical Sciences > Biomedical Engineering
Language:English
Date:1 March 2022
Deposited On:24 Dec 2021 05:50
Last Modified:25 Feb 2024 02:51
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1087-0156
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41587-021-01051-x
PubMed ID:34663920
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