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A rare case of severe gastroenteritis caused by Aeromonas hydrophila after colectomy in a patient with anti-Hu syndrome: a case report


Greiner, Michael; Anagnostopoulos, Alexia; Pohl, Daniel; Zbinden, Reinhard; Zbinden, Andrea (2021). A rare case of severe gastroenteritis caused by Aeromonas hydrophila after colectomy in a patient with anti-Hu syndrome: a case report. BMC Infectious Diseases, 21:1097.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative facultative anaerobic coccobacillus, which is an environmental opportunistic pathogen. A. hydrophila are involved in several infectious diseases such as gastroenteritis, septicemia and wound infections. However, gastroenteritis caused by Aeromonas spp. are rare and the clinical relevance of Aeromonas species in stool specimens is still under debate.

CASE PRESENTATION

Our case concerns a 32-year-old woman who presented at hospital with a worsening watery diarrhea and fever requiring intensive care. A cholera-like illness was diagnosed. The patient had a past history of an anti-Hu syndrome with a myenteric ganglionitis. A molecular multiplex RT-PCR (QIAstat-Dx Gastrointestinal Panel, QIAGEN) covering a broad spectrum of diverse gastrointestinal pathogens performed directly from the stool was negative but the stool culture revealed growth of A. hydrophila. Further investigations of the A. hydrophila strain in cell cultures revealed the presence of a cytotoxic enterotoxin.

CONCLUSIONS

Although A. hydrophila rarely causes gastroenteritis, Aeromonas spp. should be considered as a causative agent of severe gastroenteritis with a cholera-like presentation. This case highlights the need to perform culture methods from stool samples when PCR-based methods are negative and gastrointestinal infection is suspected.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative facultative anaerobic coccobacillus, which is an environmental opportunistic pathogen. A. hydrophila are involved in several infectious diseases such as gastroenteritis, septicemia and wound infections. However, gastroenteritis caused by Aeromonas spp. are rare and the clinical relevance of Aeromonas species in stool specimens is still under debate.

CASE PRESENTATION

Our case concerns a 32-year-old woman who presented at hospital with a worsening watery diarrhea and fever requiring intensive care. A cholera-like illness was diagnosed. The patient had a past history of an anti-Hu syndrome with a myenteric ganglionitis. A molecular multiplex RT-PCR (QIAstat-Dx Gastrointestinal Panel, QIAGEN) covering a broad spectrum of diverse gastrointestinal pathogens performed directly from the stool was negative but the stool culture revealed growth of A. hydrophila. Further investigations of the A. hydrophila strain in cell cultures revealed the presence of a cytotoxic enterotoxin.

CONCLUSIONS

Although A. hydrophila rarely causes gastroenteritis, Aeromonas spp. should be considered as a causative agent of severe gastroenteritis with a cholera-like presentation. This case highlights the need to perform culture methods from stool samples when PCR-based methods are negative and gastrointestinal infection is suspected.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Language:English
Date:24 October 2021
Deposited On:24 Dec 2021 05:49
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:47
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2334
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-021-06784-3
PubMed ID:34689748
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)