Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Rapid high-intensity light-curing of bulk-fill composites: A quantitative analysis of marginal integrity


Par, Matej; Spanovic, Nika; Marovic, Danijela; Attin, Thomas; Tarle, Zrinka; Tauböck, Tobias T (2021). Rapid high-intensity light-curing of bulk-fill composites: A quantitative analysis of marginal integrity. Journal of Dentistry, 111:103708.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES
To investigate the effect of rapid high-intensity light-curing on the marginal integrity of four bulk-fill composites, including two materials specifically designed for high-intensity curing.
METHODS
Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of intact human molars with simulated pulpal pressure, filled in a single increment and light-cured using a conventional (10 s @ 1,340 mW/cm$^{2}$) or high-intensity (3 s @ 3,440 mW/cm$^{2}$) protocol. The restorations were subjected to thermo-mechanical loading (TML) comprising 1,200,000 mechanical loading cycles and 3,000 thermocycles. Quantitative margin analysis was performed before and after TML using a scanning electron microscope, and the marginal integrity was expressed as percentage of continuous margin (PCM).
RESULTS
All PCM values measured before TML were statistically similar regardless of the material and curing protocol (p>0.05). A statistically significant effect of the curing protocol (p = 0.021) was identified only after TML for one material. PCM was significantly diminished by TML (p<0.001) for most combinations of material and curing protocol. The PCM values of the sculptable composites after TML were statistically similar regardless of the curing protocol (p>0.05). Compared to these values, significantly lower PCM after TML was identified for the flowable composites cured with the high-intensity protocol (p = 0.001-0.045).
CONCLUSION
In most cases, high-intensity and conventional curing generally led to similar marginal integrity. Although all of the investigated composites initially performed similarly well, the flowable composites light-cured using the high-intensity protocol showed a significantly inferior marginal integrity compared to the sculptable composites after loading.
CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE
Rapid high-intensity light-curing cannot be recommended for flowable bulk-fill composites since it may compromise the tooth-restoration interface.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES
To investigate the effect of rapid high-intensity light-curing on the marginal integrity of four bulk-fill composites, including two materials specifically designed for high-intensity curing.
METHODS
Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of intact human molars with simulated pulpal pressure, filled in a single increment and light-cured using a conventional (10 s @ 1,340 mW/cm$^{2}$) or high-intensity (3 s @ 3,440 mW/cm$^{2}$) protocol. The restorations were subjected to thermo-mechanical loading (TML) comprising 1,200,000 mechanical loading cycles and 3,000 thermocycles. Quantitative margin analysis was performed before and after TML using a scanning electron microscope, and the marginal integrity was expressed as percentage of continuous margin (PCM).
RESULTS
All PCM values measured before TML were statistically similar regardless of the material and curing protocol (p>0.05). A statistically significant effect of the curing protocol (p = 0.021) was identified only after TML for one material. PCM was significantly diminished by TML (p<0.001) for most combinations of material and curing protocol. The PCM values of the sculptable composites after TML were statistically similar regardless of the curing protocol (p>0.05). Compared to these values, significantly lower PCM after TML was identified for the flowable composites cured with the high-intensity protocol (p = 0.001-0.045).
CONCLUSION
In most cases, high-intensity and conventional curing generally led to similar marginal integrity. Although all of the investigated composites initially performed similarly well, the flowable composites light-cured using the high-intensity protocol showed a significantly inferior marginal integrity compared to the sculptable composites after loading.
CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE
Rapid high-intensity light-curing cannot be recommended for flowable bulk-fill composites since it may compromise the tooth-restoration interface.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
12 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

121 downloads since deposited on 24 Dec 2021
47 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Language:English
Date:August 2021
Deposited On:24 Dec 2021 04:53
Last Modified:26 Apr 2024 01:38
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0300-5712
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2021.103708
PubMed ID:34077801
  • Content: Accepted Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)