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Gut microbial-derived short-chain fatty acids and bone: a potential role in fracture healing


Wallimann, Alexandra; Magrath, Walker; Thompson, Keith; Moriarty, T Fintan; Richards, R Geoff; Akdis, C A; O'Mahony, L; Hernandez, C J (2021). Gut microbial-derived short-chain fatty acids and bone: a potential role in fracture healing. European Cells and Materials (ECM), 41:454-470.

Abstract

Bone healing complications such as delayed healing or non-union affect 5-10 % of patients with a long-bone fracture and lead to reduced quality of life and increased health-care costs. The gut microbiota and the metabolites they produce, mainly short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), have been shown to impact nearly all organs of the human body including bone. SCFAs show broad activity in positively influencing bone healing outcomes either by acting directly on cell types involved in fracture healing, such as osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and fibroblasts, or indirectly, by shaping an appropriate anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory response. Due to the ability of SCFAs to influence osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, SCFAs may also affect the integration of orthopaedic implants in bone. In addition, SCFA-derivatives have already been used in a variety of tissue engineering constructs to reduce inflammation and induce bone tissue production. The present review summarises the current knowledge on the role of the gut microbiota, in particular through the action of SCFAs, in the individual stages of bone healing and provides insights into how SCFAs may be utilised in a manner beneficial for fracture healing and surgical reconstruction.

Abstract

Bone healing complications such as delayed healing or non-union affect 5-10 % of patients with a long-bone fracture and lead to reduced quality of life and increased health-care costs. The gut microbiota and the metabolites they produce, mainly short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), have been shown to impact nearly all organs of the human body including bone. SCFAs show broad activity in positively influencing bone healing outcomes either by acting directly on cell types involved in fracture healing, such as osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and fibroblasts, or indirectly, by shaping an appropriate anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory response. Due to the ability of SCFAs to influence osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, SCFAs may also affect the integration of orthopaedic implants in bone. In addition, SCFA-derivatives have already been used in a variety of tissue engineering constructs to reduce inflammation and induce bone tissue production. The present review summarises the current knowledge on the role of the gut microbiota, in particular through the action of SCFAs, in the individual stages of bone healing and provides insights into how SCFAs may be utilised in a manner beneficial for fracture healing and surgical reconstruction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Bioengineering
Life Sciences > Biochemistry
Physical Sciences > Biomaterials
Physical Sciences > Biomedical Engineering
Life Sciences > Cell Biology
Language:English
Date:21 April 2021
Deposited On:31 Jan 2022 14:31
Last Modified:26 Feb 2024 02:41
Publisher:European Cells & Materials Ltd
ISSN:1473-2262
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.22203/ecm.v041a29
PubMed ID:33881768
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)