Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Nurses' views on palliative care for those diagnosed with severe persistent mental illness: A Pilot Survey Study in Switzerland


Gloeckler, Sophie; Trachsel, Manuel (2021). Nurses' views on palliative care for those diagnosed with severe persistent mental illness: A Pilot Survey Study in Switzerland. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 29(1):67-74.

Abstract

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: In recent years, some have suggested that palliative care approaches be considered for patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness. Palliative care aims to decrease the suffering related to illness rather than focusing on curing the illness. Palliative care approaches for patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness are controversial: Some argue palliative care would improve quality of life while others argue it would negatively affect patients' well-being. A recent survey found that psychiatrists from Switzerland tended to support the idea of palliative care approaches for those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness, but little is known about nurses' attitudes or beliefs regarding palliative psychiatry. WHAT THE PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Participating nurses tended to agree that palliative care approaches may be appropriate and even important in caring for those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness. Participating nurses tended to prioritize quality of life and respect for patient autonomy. Participating nurses tended to agree palliative sedation may be an appropriate intervention. WHAT THE IMPLICATIONS ARE FOR PRACTICE?: For those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness, care that aims to increase daily functioning and quality of life rather than care that looks to cure may be appropriate. Palliative psychiatry should be further explored and better defined. ABSTRACT: Introduction In recent years, palliative care approaches for patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness have been proposed, but remain controversial. Aim/Question The central research question of the present study was whether nurses consider palliative psychiatry appropriate in general and for certain patient types in particular. This pilot study is designed to inform future research. Method A quantitative survey that explored attitudes and beliefs regarding palliative care for those with severe, persistent mental illness. Results The responding 38 nurses tended to agree that palliative care approaches are suitable (73%, n = 24) and even important (62%, n = 21) in treating patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness, including interventions such as palliative sedation (73%, n = 24). Discussion Widespread support among respondents regarding palliative care approaches for those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness might be an indication that palliative approaches are already implicitly understood and incorporated into patients' care. More research is needed to determine whether these findings represent nurses' views generally. Implications for practice These finding suggest that palliative psychiatry should be further explored and developed.

Abstract

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: In recent years, some have suggested that palliative care approaches be considered for patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness. Palliative care aims to decrease the suffering related to illness rather than focusing on curing the illness. Palliative care approaches for patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness are controversial: Some argue palliative care would improve quality of life while others argue it would negatively affect patients' well-being. A recent survey found that psychiatrists from Switzerland tended to support the idea of palliative care approaches for those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness, but little is known about nurses' attitudes or beliefs regarding palliative psychiatry. WHAT THE PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Participating nurses tended to agree that palliative care approaches may be appropriate and even important in caring for those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness. Participating nurses tended to prioritize quality of life and respect for patient autonomy. Participating nurses tended to agree palliative sedation may be an appropriate intervention. WHAT THE IMPLICATIONS ARE FOR PRACTICE?: For those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness, care that aims to increase daily functioning and quality of life rather than care that looks to cure may be appropriate. Palliative psychiatry should be further explored and better defined. ABSTRACT: Introduction In recent years, palliative care approaches for patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness have been proposed, but remain controversial. Aim/Question The central research question of the present study was whether nurses consider palliative psychiatry appropriate in general and for certain patient types in particular. This pilot study is designed to inform future research. Method A quantitative survey that explored attitudes and beliefs regarding palliative care for those with severe, persistent mental illness. Results The responding 38 nurses tended to agree that palliative care approaches are suitable (73%, n = 24) and even important (62%, n = 21) in treating patients diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness, including interventions such as palliative sedation (73%, n = 24). Discussion Widespread support among respondents regarding palliative care approaches for those diagnosed with severe, persistent mental illness might be an indication that palliative approaches are already implicitly understood and incorporated into patients' care. More research is needed to determine whether these findings represent nurses' views generally. Implications for practice These finding suggest that palliative psychiatry should be further explored and developed.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
4 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatric Mental Health
Language:English
Date:12 February 2021
Deposited On:15 Feb 2022 16:56
Last Modified:26 Apr 2024 01:38
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1351-0126
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12742
PubMed ID:33580631
Full text not available from this repository.