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Treatment Failures in Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis Associated with Concomitant Charcot Arthropathy: The Role of Underlying Arteriopathy


Waibel, Felix Wa; Schöni, Madlaina; Kronberger, Leo; Flury, Andreas; Berli, Martin C; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Uçkay, Ilker; Jud, Lukas (2021). Treatment Failures in Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis Associated with Concomitant Charcot Arthropathy: The Role of Underlying Arteriopathy. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 114:15-20.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Therapy for diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) with Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy is challenging. In patients with diabetic Charcot osteomyelitis (DCO), both the anatomic deformity and infection must be addressed. This study assessed the outcomes of DCO therapy and variables associated with treatment failure and compared them with outcomes of DFO cases.

METHODS

A single-center, retrospective, case-control study was performed to compare 93 DCO episodes with 530 DFO episodes, using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses.

RESULTS

Clinical failure occurred in 21.5% of DCO compared with 22.3% in DFO episodes (p=0.89) and was associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) stages 3 or 4 (HR 6.1; CI 2.0-18.1) and chronic treatment with immunosuppressives (HR 7.4; CI 2.0-27.1). Major amputations were significantly more frequent in DCO (28% versus 13.6%; p<0.01) and associated with PAD stages 3 and 4 (HR 8.0; CI 2.2-29.4), smoking (HR 5.4; CI 1.2-24.6), alcohol abuse (HR 3.5; CI 1.1-10.6), and renal dialysis (HR 4.9; CI 1.3-18.9).

CONCLUSIONS

Clinical treatment failures did not differ between DCO and DFO. However, patients with DCO underwent major amputation twice as often as those with DFO. Unlike widespread belief, treatment failure in DCO patients may, similar to DFO, be associated with a striking epidemiological link to severe PAD.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Therapy for diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) with Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy is challenging. In patients with diabetic Charcot osteomyelitis (DCO), both the anatomic deformity and infection must be addressed. This study assessed the outcomes of DCO therapy and variables associated with treatment failure and compared them with outcomes of DFO cases.

METHODS

A single-center, retrospective, case-control study was performed to compare 93 DCO episodes with 530 DFO episodes, using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses.

RESULTS

Clinical failure occurred in 21.5% of DCO compared with 22.3% in DFO episodes (p=0.89) and was associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) stages 3 or 4 (HR 6.1; CI 2.0-18.1) and chronic treatment with immunosuppressives (HR 7.4; CI 2.0-27.1). Major amputations were significantly more frequent in DCO (28% versus 13.6%; p<0.01) and associated with PAD stages 3 and 4 (HR 8.0; CI 2.2-29.4), smoking (HR 5.4; CI 1.2-24.6), alcohol abuse (HR 3.5; CI 1.1-10.6), and renal dialysis (HR 4.9; CI 1.3-18.9).

CONCLUSIONS

Clinical treatment failures did not differ between DCO and DFO. However, patients with DCO underwent major amputation twice as often as those with DFO. Unlike widespread belief, treatment failure in DCO patients may, similar to DFO, be associated with a striking epidemiological link to severe PAD.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Microbiology (medical)
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Language:English
Date:26 October 2021
Deposited On:17 Jan 2022 09:21
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1201-9712
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2021.10.036
PubMed ID:34715357
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)