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Cuffed versus uncuffed tracheal tubes in a rabbit training model for establishing an emergency front-of-neck airway in infants: a prospective trial


Thomas, Jörg; Alonso, Elena; Wendel Garcia, Pedro D; Diem, Birgit; Kemper, Michael; Weiss, Markus; Both, Christian P (2022). Cuffed versus uncuffed tracheal tubes in a rabbit training model for establishing an emergency front-of-neck airway in infants: a prospective trial. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 128(2):382-390.

Abstract

Background: There is a paucity of evidence regarding the optimal type of tracheal tube to be advanced over a Frova catheter when performing a 'bougie' emergency front-of-neck airway (eFONA) technique in infants during a 'cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate' situation.

Methods: A prospective non-inferiority trial in a rabbit cadaver surgical tracheotomy model to assess the performance of the eFONA technique with an uncuffed 3.5 mm ID tracheal tube vs a cuffed 3.0 mm ID tracheal tube. Queried outcomes include success rate, performance time, and severe secondary airway injuries among tracheal tube types.

Results: In 60 tracheostomies performed by 30 participants, the overall success rate was 98%. Performance time was independent from tracheal tube choice (uncuffed: 61 s [95% confidence interval (CI), 52-76], cuffed: 64 s [95% CI, 55-79]; P = 0.82). No tracheal tube type was preferred in terms of usability by participants. The cuffed tracheal tube required increased force to be advanced over the Frova catheter and was associated with a risk ratio of 2.5 (95% CI, 0.53-11.9; number needed to harm, 10) for severe secondary airway injuries when compared with the uncuffed tracheal tube.

Conclusion: In performing eFONA in the rabbit cadaver model, an ID 3.5 uncuffed is non-inferior to an ID 3.0 cuffed tracheal tube regarding performance time and preference by the operator. Greater force application to advance the cuffed tube over the Frova catheter and more severe airway injuries may argue for the standardised performance of the eFONA technique with a uncuffed tracheal tube in infants.

Keywords: cannot intubate cannot oxygenate; cuffed versus uncuffed tracheal tube; emergency front-of-neck airway; emergency tracheotomy; infants; rabbit cadaver model.

Abstract

Background: There is a paucity of evidence regarding the optimal type of tracheal tube to be advanced over a Frova catheter when performing a 'bougie' emergency front-of-neck airway (eFONA) technique in infants during a 'cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate' situation.

Methods: A prospective non-inferiority trial in a rabbit cadaver surgical tracheotomy model to assess the performance of the eFONA technique with an uncuffed 3.5 mm ID tracheal tube vs a cuffed 3.0 mm ID tracheal tube. Queried outcomes include success rate, performance time, and severe secondary airway injuries among tracheal tube types.

Results: In 60 tracheostomies performed by 30 participants, the overall success rate was 98%. Performance time was independent from tracheal tube choice (uncuffed: 61 s [95% confidence interval (CI), 52-76], cuffed: 64 s [95% CI, 55-79]; P = 0.82). No tracheal tube type was preferred in terms of usability by participants. The cuffed tracheal tube required increased force to be advanced over the Frova catheter and was associated with a risk ratio of 2.5 (95% CI, 0.53-11.9; number needed to harm, 10) for severe secondary airway injuries when compared with the uncuffed tracheal tube.

Conclusion: In performing eFONA in the rabbit cadaver model, an ID 3.5 uncuffed is non-inferior to an ID 3.0 cuffed tracheal tube regarding performance time and preference by the operator. Greater force application to advance the cuffed tube over the Frova catheter and more severe airway injuries may argue for the standardised performance of the eFONA technique with a uncuffed tracheal tube in infants.

Keywords: cannot intubate cannot oxygenate; cuffed versus uncuffed tracheal tube; emergency front-of-neck airway; emergency tracheotomy; infants; rabbit cadaver model.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Intensive Care Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords:Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Language:English
Date:2022
Deposited On:18 Jan 2022 16:23
Last Modified:26 Apr 2024 01:39
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0007-0912
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bja.2021.11.017
Related URLs:https://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/213801/
PubMed ID:34920855
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