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Proteomic Approaches to Dissect Host SUMOylation during Innate Antiviral Immune Responses


Lork, Marie; Lieber, Gauthier; Hale, Benjamin G (2021). Proteomic Approaches to Dissect Host SUMOylation during Innate Antiviral Immune Responses. Viruses, 13(3):528.

Abstract

SUMOylation is a highly dynamic ubiquitin-like post-translational modification that is essential for cells to respond to and resolve various genotoxic and proteotoxic stresses. Virus infections also constitute a considerable stress scenario for cells, and recent research has started to uncover the diverse roles of SUMOylation in regulating virus replication, not least by impacting antiviral defenses. Here, we review some of the key findings of this virus-host interplay, and discuss the increasingly important contribution that large-scale, unbiased, proteomic methodologies are making to discoveries in this field. We highlight the latest proteomic technologies that have been specifically developed to understand SUMOylation dynamics in response to cellular stresses, and comment on how these techniques might be best applied to dissect the biology of SUMOylation during innate immunity. Furthermore, we showcase a selection of studies that have already used SUMO proteomics to reveal novel aspects of host innate defense against viruses, such as functional cross-talk between SUMO proteins and other ubiquitin-like modifiers, viral antagonism of SUMO-modified antiviral restriction factors, and an infection-triggered SUMO-switch that releases endogenous retroelement RNAs to stimulate antiviral interferon responses. Future research in this area has the potential to provide new and diverse mechanistic insights into host immune defenses.

Abstract

SUMOylation is a highly dynamic ubiquitin-like post-translational modification that is essential for cells to respond to and resolve various genotoxic and proteotoxic stresses. Virus infections also constitute a considerable stress scenario for cells, and recent research has started to uncover the diverse roles of SUMOylation in regulating virus replication, not least by impacting antiviral defenses. Here, we review some of the key findings of this virus-host interplay, and discuss the increasingly important contribution that large-scale, unbiased, proteomic methodologies are making to discoveries in this field. We highlight the latest proteomic technologies that have been specifically developed to understand SUMOylation dynamics in response to cellular stresses, and comment on how these techniques might be best applied to dissect the biology of SUMOylation during innate immunity. Furthermore, we showcase a selection of studies that have already used SUMO proteomics to reveal novel aspects of host innate defense against viruses, such as functional cross-talk between SUMO proteins and other ubiquitin-like modifiers, viral antagonism of SUMO-modified antiviral restriction factors, and an infection-triggered SUMO-switch that releases endogenous retroelement RNAs to stimulate antiviral interferon responses. Future research in this area has the potential to provide new and diverse mechanistic insights into host immune defenses.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Life Sciences > Virology
Language:English
Date:23 March 2021
Deposited On:20 Jan 2022 15:40
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:50
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:1999-4915
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/v13030528
PubMed ID:33806893
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)