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T-cell memory in tissues


van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Zens, Kyra D; Münz, Christian (2021). T-cell memory in tissues. European Journal of Immunology, 51(6):1310-1324.

Abstract

Immunological memory equips our immune system to respond faster and more effectively against reinfections. This acquired immunity was originally attributed to long-lived, memory T and B cells with body wide access to peripheral and secondary lymphoid tissues. In recent years, it has been realized that both innate and adaptive immunity to a large degree depends on resident immune cells that act locally in barrier tissues including tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm). Here, we will discuss the phenotype of these Trm in mice and humans, the tissues and niches that support them, and their function, plasticity, and transcriptional control. Their unique properties enable Trm to achieve long-lived immunological memory that can be deposited in nearly every organ in response to acute and persistent infection, and in response to cancer. However, Trm may also induce substantial immunopathology in allergic and autoimmune disease if their actions remain unchecked. Therefore, inhibitory and activating stimuli appear to balance the actions of Trm to ensure rapid proinflammatory responses upon infection and to prevent damage to host tissues under steady state conditions.

Abstract

Immunological memory equips our immune system to respond faster and more effectively against reinfections. This acquired immunity was originally attributed to long-lived, memory T and B cells with body wide access to peripheral and secondary lymphoid tissues. In recent years, it has been realized that both innate and adaptive immunity to a large degree depends on resident immune cells that act locally in barrier tissues including tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm). Here, we will discuss the phenotype of these Trm in mice and humans, the tissues and niches that support them, and their function, plasticity, and transcriptional control. Their unique properties enable Trm to achieve long-lived immunological memory that can be deposited in nearly every organ in response to acute and persistent infection, and in response to cancer. However, Trm may also induce substantial immunopathology in allergic and autoimmune disease if their actions remain unchecked. Therefore, inhibitory and activating stimuli appear to balance the actions of Trm to ensure rapid proinflammatory responses upon infection and to prevent damage to host tissues under steady state conditions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Immunology and Allergy
Life Sciences > Immunology
Language:English
Date:June 2021
Deposited On:28 Jan 2022 14:32
Last Modified:27 Mar 2024 03:10
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag
ISSN:0014-2980
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/eji.202049062
PubMed ID:33837521