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Visualization of individual cell division history in complex tissues using iCOUNT


Denoth-Lippuner, Annina; Jaeger, Baptiste N; Liang, Tong; Royall, Lars N; Chie, Stefanie E; Buthey, Kilian; Machado, Diana; Korobeynyk, Vladislav I; Kruse, Merit; Munz, Clara M; Gerbaulet, Alexander; Simons, Benjamin D; Jessberger, Sebastian (2021). Visualization of individual cell division history in complex tissues using iCOUNT. Cell Stem Cell, 28(11):2020-2034.e12.

Abstract

The division potential of individual stem cells and the molecular consequences of successive rounds of proliferation remain largely unknown. Here, we developed an inducible cell division counter (iCOUNT) that reports cell division events in human and mouse tissues in vitro and in vivo. Analyzing cell division histories of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the developing and adult brain, we show that iCOUNT can provide novel insights into stem cell behavior. Further, we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) of iCOUNT-labeled NSPCs and their progenies from the developing mouse cortex and forebrain-regionalized human organoids to identify functionally relevant molecular pathways that are commonly regulated between mouse and human cells, depending on individual cell division histories. Thus, we developed a tool to characterize the molecular consequences of repeated cell divisions of stem cells that allows an analysis of the cellular principles underlying tissue formation, homeostasis, and repair.

Abstract

The division potential of individual stem cells and the molecular consequences of successive rounds of proliferation remain largely unknown. Here, we developed an inducible cell division counter (iCOUNT) that reports cell division events in human and mouse tissues in vitro and in vivo. Analyzing cell division histories of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the developing and adult brain, we show that iCOUNT can provide novel insights into stem cell behavior. Further, we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) of iCOUNT-labeled NSPCs and their progenies from the developing mouse cortex and forebrain-regionalized human organoids to identify functionally relevant molecular pathways that are commonly regulated between mouse and human cells, depending on individual cell division histories. Thus, we developed a tool to characterize the molecular consequences of repeated cell divisions of stem cells that allows an analysis of the cellular principles underlying tissue formation, homeostasis, and repair.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Molecular Medicine
Life Sciences > Genetics
Life Sciences > Cell Biology
Language:English
Date:4 November 2021
Deposited On:31 Jan 2022 06:46
Last Modified:27 Mar 2024 03:10
Publisher:Cell Press (Elsevier)
ISSN:1875-9777
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2021.08.012
PubMed ID:34525348
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)