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One SMS a day keeps the stress away? A just‐in‐time planning intervention to reduce occupational stress among apprentices


Schenkel, Konstantin; Haug, Severin; Paz Castro, Raquel; Lüscher, Janina; Scholz, Urte; Schaub, Michael P; Radtke, Theda (2022). One SMS a day keeps the stress away? A just‐in‐time planning intervention to reduce occupational stress among apprentices. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, 14(4):1389-1407.

Abstract

Background: Occupational stress is one of the main sources of stress in apprentices with physical and psychological health consequences. Just-in-time planning interventions (JITPIs) are one opportunity to deliver intervention components at the right times and locations to optimally support apprentices in stressful situations. The aim of this study was to test the proximal effect of a mobile phone-delivered JITPI to reduce occupational stress in 386 apprentices within a planning intervention.

Methods: An AB/BA crossover design in which participants were randomly allocated to (A) the planning intervention or (B) the assessment only condition was implemented.

Results: The analyses of the study “ready4life”, multilevel modeling, revealed no significant effect of the planning intervention on occupational stress reduction.

Conclusions: Possible reasons for the missing effect might be the low stress level of participants or the type of the intervention delivery. Since apprenticeships in Switzerland differ considerably, future studies should enable more adapted interventions for the apprentices and consider individual circumstances of stress. Further, the intervention should focus on apprentices with high occupational stress levels or a high-risk of stress. Studies should investigate exactly when and why a person needs support regarding her/his occupational stress. Therefore, objective measurements of stress could be helpful.

Abstract

Background: Occupational stress is one of the main sources of stress in apprentices with physical and psychological health consequences. Just-in-time planning interventions (JITPIs) are one opportunity to deliver intervention components at the right times and locations to optimally support apprentices in stressful situations. The aim of this study was to test the proximal effect of a mobile phone-delivered JITPI to reduce occupational stress in 386 apprentices within a planning intervention.

Methods: An AB/BA crossover design in which participants were randomly allocated to (A) the planning intervention or (B) the assessment only condition was implemented.

Results: The analyses of the study “ready4life”, multilevel modeling, revealed no significant effect of the planning intervention on occupational stress reduction.

Conclusions: Possible reasons for the missing effect might be the low stress level of participants or the type of the intervention delivery. Since apprenticeships in Switzerland differ considerably, future studies should enable more adapted interventions for the apprentices and consider individual circumstances of stress. Further, the intervention should focus on apprentices with high occupational stress levels or a high-risk of stress. Studies should investigate exactly when and why a person needs support regarding her/his occupational stress. Therefore, objective measurements of stress could be helpful.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Applied Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Applied Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 November 2022
Deposited On:31 Jan 2022 10:47
Last Modified:28 Jan 2024 02:42
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1758-0854
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/aphw.12340
PubMed ID:35060336
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)