Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Child-directed and overheard input from different speakers in two distinct cultures


Loukatou, Georgia; Scaff, Camila; Demuth, Katherine; Cristia, Alejandrina; Havron, Naomi (2022). Child-directed and overheard input from different speakers in two distinct cultures. Journal of Child Language, 49(6):1173-1192.

Abstract

Despite the fact that in most communities interaction occurs between the child and multiple speakers, most previous research on input to children focused on input from mothers. We annotated recordings of Sesotho-learning toddlers living in non-industrial Lesotho in South Africa, and French-learning toddlers living in urban regions in France. We examined who produced the input (mothers, other children, adults), how much input was child directed, and whether and how it varied across speakers. As expected, mothers contributed most of the input in the French recordings. However, in the Sesotho recordings, input from other children was more common than input from mothers or other adults. Child-directed speech from all speakers in both cultural groups showed similar qualitative modifications. Our findings suggest that input from other children is prevalent and has similar features as child-directed from adults described in previous work, inviting cross-cultural research into the effects of input from other children.

Abstract

Despite the fact that in most communities interaction occurs between the child and multiple speakers, most previous research on input to children focused on input from mothers. We annotated recordings of Sesotho-learning toddlers living in non-industrial Lesotho in South Africa, and French-learning toddlers living in urban regions in France. We examined who produced the input (mothers, other children, adults), how much input was child directed, and whether and how it varied across speakers. As expected, mothers contributed most of the input in the French recordings. However, in the Sesotho recordings, input from other children was more common than input from mothers or other adults. Child-directed speech from all speakers in both cultural groups showed similar qualitative modifications. Our findings suggest that input from other children is prevalent and has similar features as child-directed from adults described in previous work, inviting cross-cultural research into the effects of input from other children.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
11 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 November 2022
Deposited On:01 Feb 2022 16:42
Last Modified:18 Jun 2024 03:35
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0305-0009
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0305000921000623
PubMed ID:34663486
Full text not available from this repository.