Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Precision mouse models of Yars/dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type C and Sptlc1/hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1


Hines, Timothy J; Tadenev, Abigail L D; Lone, Museer A; Hatton, Courtney L; Bagasrawala, Inseyah; Stum, Morgane G; Miers, Kathy E; Hornemann, Thorsten; Burgess, Robert W (2022). Precision mouse models of Yars/dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type C and Sptlc1/hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1. Journal of Anatomy, 241(5):1169-1185.

Abstract

Animal models of neurodegenerative diseases such as inherited peripheral neuropathies sometimes accurately recreate the pathophysiology of the human disease, and sometimes accurately recreate the genetic perturbations found in patients. Ideally, models achieve both, but this is not always possible; nonetheless, such models are informative. Here we describe two animal models of inherited peripheral neuropathy: mice with a mutation in tyrosyl tRNA-synthetase, YarsE196K, modeling dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type C (diCMTC), and mice with a mutation in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain 1, Sptlc1C133W, modeling hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). YarsE196K mice develop disease-relevant phenotypes including reduced motor performance and reduced nerve conduction velocities by 4 months of age. Peripheral motor axons are reduced in size, but there is no reduction in axon number and plasma neurofilament light chain levels are not increased. Unlike the dominant human mutations, the YarsE196K mice only show these phenotypes as homozygotes, or as compound heterozygotes with a null allele, and no phenotype is observed in E196K or null heterozygotes. The Sptlc1C133W mice carry a knockin allele and show the anticipated increase in 1-deoxysphingolipids in circulation and in a variety of tissues. They also have mild behavioral defects consistent with HSAN1, but do not show neurophysiological defects or axon loss in peripheral nerves or in the epidermis of the hind paw or tail. Thus, despite the biochemical phenotype, the Sptlc1C133W mice do not show a strong neuropathy phenotype. Surprisingly, these mice were lethal as homozygotes, but the heterozygous genotype studied corresponds to the dominant genetics seen in humans. Thus, YarsE196K homozygous mice have a relevant phenotype, but imprecisely reproduce the human genetics, whereas the Sptlc1C133W mice precisely reproduce the human genetics, but do not recreate the disease phenotype. Despite these shortcomings, both models are informative and will be useful for future research.

Abstract

Animal models of neurodegenerative diseases such as inherited peripheral neuropathies sometimes accurately recreate the pathophysiology of the human disease, and sometimes accurately recreate the genetic perturbations found in patients. Ideally, models achieve both, but this is not always possible; nonetheless, such models are informative. Here we describe two animal models of inherited peripheral neuropathy: mice with a mutation in tyrosyl tRNA-synthetase, YarsE196K, modeling dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type C (diCMTC), and mice with a mutation in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain 1, Sptlc1C133W, modeling hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). YarsE196K mice develop disease-relevant phenotypes including reduced motor performance and reduced nerve conduction velocities by 4 months of age. Peripheral motor axons are reduced in size, but there is no reduction in axon number and plasma neurofilament light chain levels are not increased. Unlike the dominant human mutations, the YarsE196K mice only show these phenotypes as homozygotes, or as compound heterozygotes with a null allele, and no phenotype is observed in E196K or null heterozygotes. The Sptlc1C133W mice carry a knockin allele and show the anticipated increase in 1-deoxysphingolipids in circulation and in a variety of tissues. They also have mild behavioral defects consistent with HSAN1, but do not show neurophysiological defects or axon loss in peripheral nerves or in the epidermis of the hind paw or tail. Thus, despite the biochemical phenotype, the Sptlc1C133W mice do not show a strong neuropathy phenotype. Surprisingly, these mice were lethal as homozygotes, but the heterozygous genotype studied corresponds to the dominant genetics seen in humans. Thus, YarsE196K homozygous mice have a relevant phenotype, but imprecisely reproduce the human genetics, whereas the Sptlc1C133W mice precisely reproduce the human genetics, but do not recreate the disease phenotype. Despite these shortcomings, both models are informative and will be useful for future research.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
9 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Anatomy
Health Sciences > Histology
Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > Developmental Biology
Life Sciences > Cell Biology
Language:English
Date:1 November 2022
Deposited On:03 Feb 2022 07:08
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:52
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0021-8782
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/joa.13605
PubMed ID:34875719
Full text not available from this repository.