Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Peripheral biopterin and neopterin in schizophrenia and depression


Klaus, Federica; Guetter, Karoline; Schlegel, Rebecca; Seifritz, Erich; Rassi, Anahita; Thöny, Beat; Cathomas, Flurin; Kaiser, Stefan (2021). Peripheral biopterin and neopterin in schizophrenia and depression. Psychiatry Research, 297:113745.

Abstract

Increasing evidence points to a causal involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Neopterin and biopterin may link peripheral immune system activation and central neurotransmitter alterations. However, it is not fully established whether these alterations are transdiagnostic or disorder-specific and whether they are associated with reward-related psychopathologies. We investigated group differences in neopterin and biopterin in the plasma of healthy comparison (HC) (n=19), SZ (n=45) and MDD (n=43) participants. We then correlated plasma proteins with CRP as a measure for inflammation. Lastly, plasma proteins were correlated with the reward-related psychopathological domain apathy. We found a trend-level difference in biopterin levels and no significant difference in neopterin levels between groups. Within both patient groups, but not HC, we show a significant positive correlation of CRP with neopterin but not with biopterin. Further, we observed no significant correlations of plasma proteins with reward-related psychopathology in HC, MDD or SZ. While our study shows trend-level alterations of biopterin with relevance for future research, it does not support the hypothesis that peripheral neopterin or biopterin are associated with reward-related psychopathology.

Abstract

Increasing evidence points to a causal involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Neopterin and biopterin may link peripheral immune system activation and central neurotransmitter alterations. However, it is not fully established whether these alterations are transdiagnostic or disorder-specific and whether they are associated with reward-related psychopathologies. We investigated group differences in neopterin and biopterin in the plasma of healthy comparison (HC) (n=19), SZ (n=45) and MDD (n=43) participants. We then correlated plasma proteins with CRP as a measure for inflammation. Lastly, plasma proteins were correlated with the reward-related psychopathological domain apathy. We found a trend-level difference in biopterin levels and no significant difference in neopterin levels between groups. Within both patient groups, but not HC, we show a significant positive correlation of CRP with neopterin but not with biopterin. Further, we observed no significant correlations of plasma proteins with reward-related psychopathology in HC, MDD or SZ. While our study shows trend-level alterations of biopterin with relevance for future research, it does not support the hypothesis that peripheral neopterin or biopterin are associated with reward-related psychopathology.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
7 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

33 downloads since deposited on 04 Feb 2022
18 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Biological Psychiatry
Language:English
Date:March 2021
Deposited On:04 Feb 2022 10:49
Last Modified:26 Jun 2024 01:52
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2021.113745
PubMed ID:33524773
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)