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Hemodynamic response to sensory stimulation in mice: Comparison between functional ultrasound and optoacoustic imaging


Robin, Justine; Rau, Richard; Lafci, Berkan; Schroeter, Aileen; Reiss, Michael; Deán-Ben, Xosé-Luís; Goksel, Orcun; Razansky, Daniel (2021). Hemodynamic response to sensory stimulation in mice: Comparison between functional ultrasound and optoacoustic imaging. NeuroImage, 237:118111.

Abstract

Intense efforts are underway to develop functional imaging modalities for capturing brain activity at the whole organ scale with high spatial and temporal resolution. Functional optoacoustic (fOA) imaging is emerging as a new tool to monitor multiple hemodynamic parameters across the mouse brain, but its sound validation against other neuroimaging modalities is often lacking. Here we investigate mouse brain responses to peripheral sensory stimulation using both fOA and functional ultrasound (fUS) imaging. The two modalities operate under similar spatio-temporal resolution regime, with a potential to provide synergistic and complementary hemodynamic readouts. Specific contralateral activation was observed with sub-millimeter spatial resolution with both methods. Sensitivity to hemodynamic activity was found to be on comparable levels, with the strongest responses obtained in the oxygenated hemoglobin channel of fOA. While the techniques attained highly correlated hemodynamic responses, the differential fOA readings of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin provided complementary information to the blood flow contrast of fUS. The multi-modal approach may thus emerge as a powerful tool providing new insights into brain function, complementing our current knowledge generated with well-established neuroimaging methods.

Abstract

Intense efforts are underway to develop functional imaging modalities for capturing brain activity at the whole organ scale with high spatial and temporal resolution. Functional optoacoustic (fOA) imaging is emerging as a new tool to monitor multiple hemodynamic parameters across the mouse brain, but its sound validation against other neuroimaging modalities is often lacking. Here we investigate mouse brain responses to peripheral sensory stimulation using both fOA and functional ultrasound (fUS) imaging. The two modalities operate under similar spatio-temporal resolution regime, with a potential to provide synergistic and complementary hemodynamic readouts. Specific contralateral activation was observed with sub-millimeter spatial resolution with both methods. Sensitivity to hemodynamic activity was found to be on comparable levels, with the strongest responses obtained in the oxygenated hemoglobin channel of fOA. While the techniques attained highly correlated hemodynamic responses, the differential fOA readings of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin provided complementary information to the blood flow contrast of fUS. The multi-modal approach may thus emerge as a powerful tool providing new insights into brain function, complementing our current knowledge generated with well-established neuroimaging methods.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Neurology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cognitive Neuroscience, Neurology
Language:English
Date:1 August 2021
Deposited On:16 Feb 2022 16:05
Last Modified:27 Apr 2024 01:35
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118111
PubMed ID:33940140
Project Information:
  • : FunderEuropean Research Council
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P2_179116
  • : Project TitleImaging Soft Tissue Elasticity
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)