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Personality Disorders


Hopwood, Christopher J; Thomas, Katherine M (2014). Personality Disorders. In: Beidel, Deborah C; Frueh, B Christopher; Hersen, M. Adult Psychopathology and Diagnosis / 7th edition. New Jersey: Wiley, 739-773.

Abstract

In this chapter, we describe personality pathology and personality disorders (PDs), review their history, clinical presentation, and construct validity, and compare the DSM-5 Section II and III models of PD with a clinical case. In general it can be concluded that personality pathology is common and associated with profound functional impairments and personal and societal costs. Although recent research advances provide new, promising methods for assessing and treating PDs, much remains unknown about how to assess and treat personality problems. The upcoming DSM-5 could contribute to further understanding and clinical utility. However, there is a long history of research and clinical neglect on PDs, so understanding of many aspects of personality pathology is severely limited. Future directions for research include better understanding associations between normative traits and personality-related impairments, developing stronger links between research and practice, and incorporating dynamic elements of personality into existing models. Advances in these areas should contribute to an improved understanding of etiology and ultimately to more effective assessment and treatment methods.

Abstract

In this chapter, we describe personality pathology and personality disorders (PDs), review their history, clinical presentation, and construct validity, and compare the DSM-5 Section II and III models of PD with a clinical case. In general it can be concluded that personality pathology is common and associated with profound functional impairments and personal and societal costs. Although recent research advances provide new, promising methods for assessing and treating PDs, much remains unknown about how to assess and treat personality problems. The upcoming DSM-5 could contribute to further understanding and clinical utility. However, there is a long history of research and clinical neglect on PDs, so understanding of many aspects of personality pathology is severely limited. Future directions for research include better understanding associations between normative traits and personality-related impairments, developing stronger links between research and practice, and incorporating dynamic elements of personality into existing models. Advances in these areas should contribute to an improved understanding of etiology and ultimately to more effective assessment and treatment methods.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Biological Psychiatry
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:10 May 2022 08:52
Last Modified:27 Jun 2024 01:37
Publisher:Wiley
ISBN:978-1118657089
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.01.007
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