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A Tumor-Homing Peptide Platform Enhances Drug Solubility, Improves Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability and Targets Glioblastoma


Cho, Choi-Fong; Farquhar, Charlotte E; Fadzen, Colin M; Scott, Benjamin; Zhuang, Pei; von Spreckelsen, Niklas; Loas, Andrei; Hartrampf, Nina; Pentelute, Bradley L; Lawler, Sean E (2022). A Tumor-Homing Peptide Platform Enhances Drug Solubility, Improves Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability and Targets Glioblastoma. Cancers, 14(9):2207.

Abstract

Background: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and deadliest malignant primary brain tumor, contributing significant morbidity and mortality among patients. As current standard-of-care demonstrates limited success, the development of new efficacious GBM therapeutics is urgently needed. Major challenges in advancing GBM chemotherapy include poor bioavailability, lack of tumor selectivity leading to undesired side effects, poor permeability across the blood–brain barrier (BBB), and extensive intratumoral heterogeneity. Methods: We have previously identified a small, soluble peptide (BTP-7) that is able to cross the BBB and target the human GBM extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we covalently attached BTP-7 to an insoluble anti-cancer drug, camptothecin (CPT). Results: We demonstrate that conjugation of BTP-7 to CPT improves drug solubility in aqueous solution, retains drug efficacy against patient-derived GBM stem cells (GSC), enhances BBB permeability, and enables therapeutic targeting to intracranial GBM, leading to higher toxicity in GBM cells compared to normal brain tissues, and ultimately prolongs survival in mice bearing intracranial patient-derived GBM xenograft. Conclusion: BTP-7 is a new modality that opens the door to possibilities for GBM-targeted therapeutic approaches.
Keywords: glioblastoma; peptide; brevican; drug targeting; precision medicine; chemotherapy; blood–brain barrier

Abstract

Background: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and deadliest malignant primary brain tumor, contributing significant morbidity and mortality among patients. As current standard-of-care demonstrates limited success, the development of new efficacious GBM therapeutics is urgently needed. Major challenges in advancing GBM chemotherapy include poor bioavailability, lack of tumor selectivity leading to undesired side effects, poor permeability across the blood–brain barrier (BBB), and extensive intratumoral heterogeneity. Methods: We have previously identified a small, soluble peptide (BTP-7) that is able to cross the BBB and target the human GBM extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we covalently attached BTP-7 to an insoluble anti-cancer drug, camptothecin (CPT). Results: We demonstrate that conjugation of BTP-7 to CPT improves drug solubility in aqueous solution, retains drug efficacy against patient-derived GBM stem cells (GSC), enhances BBB permeability, and enables therapeutic targeting to intracranial GBM, leading to higher toxicity in GBM cells compared to normal brain tissues, and ultimately prolongs survival in mice bearing intracranial patient-derived GBM xenograft. Conclusion: BTP-7 is a new modality that opens the door to possibilities for GBM-targeted therapeutic approaches.
Keywords: glioblastoma; peptide; brevican; drug targeting; precision medicine; chemotherapy; blood–brain barrier

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Oncology
Life Sciences > Cancer Research
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cancer Research, Oncology
Language:English
Date:28 April 2022
Deposited On:28 Jun 2022 13:20
Last Modified:27 Apr 2024 01:38
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2072-6694
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14092207
PubMed ID:35565337
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)