Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Machine learning based prediction and the influence of complement - Coagulation pathway proteins on clinical outcome: Results from the NEURAPRO trial


Abstract

BACKGROUND: Functional outcomes are important measures in the overall clinical course of psychosis and individuals at clinical high-risk (CHR), however, prediction of functional outcome remains difficult based on clinical information alone. In the first part of this study, we evaluated whether a combination of biological and clinical variables could predict future functional outcome in CHR individuals. The complement and coagulation pathways have previously been identified as being of relevance to the pathophysiology of psychosis and have been found to contribute to the prediction of clinical outcome in CHR participants. Hence, in the second part we extended the analysis to evaluate specifically the relationship of complement and coagulation proteins with psychotic symptoms and functional outcome in CHR.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out plasma proteomics and measured plasma cytokine levels, and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid levels in a sub-sample (n = 158) from the NEURAPRO clinical trial at baseline and 6 months follow up. Functional outcome was measured using Social and Occupational Functional assessment Score (SOFAS) scale. Firstly, we used support vector machine learning techniques to develop predictive models for functional outcome at 12 months. Secondly, we developed linear regression models to understand the association between 6-month follow-up levels of complement and coagulation proteins with 6-month follow-up measures of positive symptoms summary (PSS) scores and functional outcome.
RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A prediction model based on clinical and biological data including the plasma proteome, erythrocyte fatty acids and cytokines, poorly predicted functional outcome at 12 months follow-up in CHR participants. In linear regression models, four complement and coagulation proteins (coagulation protein X, Complement C1r subcomponent like protein, Complement C4A & Complement C5) indicated a significant association with functional outcome; and two proteins (coagulation factor IX and complement C5) positively associated with the PSS score. Our study does not provide support for the utility of cytokines, proteomic or fatty acid data for prediction of functional outcomes in individuals at high-risk for psychosis. However, the association of complement protein levels with clinical outcome suggests a role for the complement system and the activity of its related pathway in the functional impairment and positive symptom severity of CHR patients.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Functional outcomes are important measures in the overall clinical course of psychosis and individuals at clinical high-risk (CHR), however, prediction of functional outcome remains difficult based on clinical information alone. In the first part of this study, we evaluated whether a combination of biological and clinical variables could predict future functional outcome in CHR individuals. The complement and coagulation pathways have previously been identified as being of relevance to the pathophysiology of psychosis and have been found to contribute to the prediction of clinical outcome in CHR participants. Hence, in the second part we extended the analysis to evaluate specifically the relationship of complement and coagulation proteins with psychotic symptoms and functional outcome in CHR.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out plasma proteomics and measured plasma cytokine levels, and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid levels in a sub-sample (n = 158) from the NEURAPRO clinical trial at baseline and 6 months follow up. Functional outcome was measured using Social and Occupational Functional assessment Score (SOFAS) scale. Firstly, we used support vector machine learning techniques to develop predictive models for functional outcome at 12 months. Secondly, we developed linear regression models to understand the association between 6-month follow-up levels of complement and coagulation proteins with 6-month follow-up measures of positive symptoms summary (PSS) scores and functional outcome.
RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A prediction model based on clinical and biological data including the plasma proteome, erythrocyte fatty acids and cytokines, poorly predicted functional outcome at 12 months follow-up in CHR participants. In linear regression models, four complement and coagulation proteins (coagulation protein X, Complement C1r subcomponent like protein, Complement C4A & Complement C5) indicated a significant association with functional outcome; and two proteins (coagulation factor IX and complement C5) positively associated with the PSS score. Our study does not provide support for the utility of cytokines, proteomic or fatty acid data for prediction of functional outcomes in individuals at high-risk for psychosis. However, the association of complement protein levels with clinical outcome suggests a role for the complement system and the activity of its related pathway in the functional impairment and positive symptom severity of CHR patients.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 16 Aug 2022
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Immunology
Life Sciences > Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Clinical high risk, Functional outcome, Prediction models, Psychosis, Schizophrenia
Language:English
Date:July 2022
Deposited On:16 Aug 2022 16:45
Last Modified:27 Apr 2024 01:38
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0889-1591
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2022.03.013
PubMed ID:35341915