Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The importance of indirect effects of climate change adaptations on alpine and pre-alpine freshwater systems


Brosse, Morgane; Benateau, Simon; Gaudard, Adrien; Stamm, Christian; Altermatt, Florian (2022). The importance of indirect effects of climate change adaptations on alpine and pre-alpine freshwater systems. Ecological Solutions and Evidence, 3(1):e12127.

Abstract

1. Freshwater is vital to much life on Earth and is an essential resource for humans. Climate change,however, dramatically changes freshwater systems and reduces water quality, poses a risk to drinking water availability and has severe impacts on aquatic ecosystems and their biodiversity.
2. The direct effects of climate change, such as increased temperatures and higher frequency of extreme meteorological events, interact with human responses to climate change, which we refer to here as ‘indirect effects’. The latter possibly have even greater impact than the direct effects of climate change. Specifically, changes in land-use practices as responses to climate change, such as adjusted cropping regimes or a shift to renewable hydroelectricity to mitigate climate change, can very strongly affect freshwater ecosystems.
3. Hitherto, these indirect effects and the possibility of idiosyncratic outcomes are under-recognized. Here, we synthesize knowledge and identify threats to freshwater environments in alpine and pre-alpine regions, which are particularly affected by climate change.
4. We focus on the effects of adapted agriculture and hydropower production on freshwater quality and ecological status, as these examples have strong indirect effects that interact with direct effects of climate change (e.g., water temperature, droughts, isolation of populations).
5. We outline how failure to effectively account for indirect effects associated with human responses to climate change may exacerbate direct climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems. If managed properly, however, human responses to indirect effects offer potential for rapid and implementable leverage to mitigate some of the direct climate change effects on aquatic ecosystems. To better address looming risks, policy- and decisionmakers must account for indirect effects and incorporate them into restoration planning and the respective sectorial policies.

Abstract

1. Freshwater is vital to much life on Earth and is an essential resource for humans. Climate change,however, dramatically changes freshwater systems and reduces water quality, poses a risk to drinking water availability and has severe impacts on aquatic ecosystems and their biodiversity.
2. The direct effects of climate change, such as increased temperatures and higher frequency of extreme meteorological events, interact with human responses to climate change, which we refer to here as ‘indirect effects’. The latter possibly have even greater impact than the direct effects of climate change. Specifically, changes in land-use practices as responses to climate change, such as adjusted cropping regimes or a shift to renewable hydroelectricity to mitigate climate change, can very strongly affect freshwater ecosystems.
3. Hitherto, these indirect effects and the possibility of idiosyncratic outcomes are under-recognized. Here, we synthesize knowledge and identify threats to freshwater environments in alpine and pre-alpine regions, which are particularly affected by climate change.
4. We focus on the effects of adapted agriculture and hydropower production on freshwater quality and ecological status, as these examples have strong indirect effects that interact with direct effects of climate change (e.g., water temperature, droughts, isolation of populations).
5. We outline how failure to effectively account for indirect effects associated with human responses to climate change may exacerbate direct climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems. If managed properly, however, human responses to indirect effects offer potential for rapid and implementable leverage to mitigate some of the direct climate change effects on aquatic ecosystems. To better address looming risks, policy- and decisionmakers must account for indirect effects and incorporate them into restoration planning and the respective sectorial policies.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

15 downloads since deposited on 02 Sep 2022
7 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:08 Research Priority Programs > Global Change and Biodiversity
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Ecology
Physical Sciences > Global and Planetary Change
Physical Sciences > Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
Physical Sciences > Nature and Landscape Conservation
Uncontrolled Keywords:agriculture, aquatic ecosystems, climate change, ecosystem change, hydropower, land-use, water quality
Language:English
Date:1 January 2022
Deposited On:02 Sep 2022 11:52
Last Modified:27 Jun 2024 01:39
Publisher:Wiley Open Access
ISSN:2688-8319
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/2688-8319.12127
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID31003A_173074
  • : Project TitleRiverDNA: uncovering fundamental biodiversity in riverine systems using environmental DNA
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P3_179089
  • : Project TitleBridging biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: a meta-ecosystem perspective
  • : FunderUniversität Zürich
  • : Grant IDURPP-Global Change & Biodiversity
  • : Project TitleToward a better integration of evolution and community ecology
  • : Project Websitehttps://www.gcb.uzh.ch/en/Research/Phase-II-Projects/Landscapes/Project-2-Florian-Altermatt.html
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)