Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Longer-Term Efficacy of a Digital Life-Skills Training for Substance Use Prevention


Paz Castro, Raquel; Haug, Severin; Wenger, Andreas; Schaub, Michael P (2022). Longer-Term Efficacy of a Digital Life-Skills Training for Substance Use Prevention. American Journal of Preventive Medicine:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Introduction: The main objective of this study was to test the longer-term and differential efficacy of a mobile phone‒based life-skills training program designed to prevent substance use among adolescents.
Study design: A 2-arm, parallel-group, cluster RCT with assessments at baseline and follow-up after 6 and 18 months was conducted. The efficacy of the intervention was compared with that of an assessment-only control condition.
Setting/participants: A total of 1,473 students with a mean age of 15.4 years were recruited in 2019/2020 within 89 Swiss secondary and upper secondary school classes.
Intervention: The automated intervention program included online feedback and individually tailored text messages provided over 22 weeks. The contents were based on social cognitive theory and addressed self-management, social, and substance use resistance skills.
Main outcome measures: Primary outcomes included 30-day prevalence rates for problem drinking and tobacco use.
Results: The 18-month follow-up assessments were completed by 1,232 study (83.6%) participants. Those in the intervention group reported lower tobacco-smoking prevalence than the controls (OR=0.67; 95% CI=0.47, 0.96), but no significant difference in problem drinking (OR=0.84; 95% CI=0.61, 1.17) was observed. Among secondary outcomes, the intervention was effective at reducing cannabis-smoking prevalence (OR=0.55; 95% CI=0.39, 0.76) and cannabis use days (Cohen's d= -0.19; 95% CI= -0.29, -0.09), whereas no effects were observed for quantity of alcohol use, quantity of cigarettes smoked, well-being, or social skills. No significant moderators of the primary outcomes were observed.
Conclusions: An automated mobile phone‒based life-skills training program produced longer-term effectiveness in preventing tobacco smoking and cannabis use, whereas no effects were observed for problem drinking. These results suggest that digitally delivered life-skills training programs are similarly effective and are an easy-to-implement alternative to training conducted within a school curriculum.

Abstract

Introduction: The main objective of this study was to test the longer-term and differential efficacy of a mobile phone‒based life-skills training program designed to prevent substance use among adolescents.
Study design: A 2-arm, parallel-group, cluster RCT with assessments at baseline and follow-up after 6 and 18 months was conducted. The efficacy of the intervention was compared with that of an assessment-only control condition.
Setting/participants: A total of 1,473 students with a mean age of 15.4 years were recruited in 2019/2020 within 89 Swiss secondary and upper secondary school classes.
Intervention: The automated intervention program included online feedback and individually tailored text messages provided over 22 weeks. The contents were based on social cognitive theory and addressed self-management, social, and substance use resistance skills.
Main outcome measures: Primary outcomes included 30-day prevalence rates for problem drinking and tobacco use.
Results: The 18-month follow-up assessments were completed by 1,232 study (83.6%) participants. Those in the intervention group reported lower tobacco-smoking prevalence than the controls (OR=0.67; 95% CI=0.47, 0.96), but no significant difference in problem drinking (OR=0.84; 95% CI=0.61, 1.17) was observed. Among secondary outcomes, the intervention was effective at reducing cannabis-smoking prevalence (OR=0.55; 95% CI=0.39, 0.76) and cannabis use days (Cohen's d= -0.19; 95% CI= -0.29, -0.09), whereas no effects were observed for quantity of alcohol use, quantity of cigarettes smoked, well-being, or social skills. No significant moderators of the primary outcomes were observed.
Conclusions: An automated mobile phone‒based life-skills training program produced longer-term effectiveness in preventing tobacco smoking and cannabis use, whereas no effects were observed for problem drinking. These results suggest that digitally delivered life-skills training programs are similarly effective and are an easy-to-implement alternative to training conducted within a school curriculum.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 14 Sep 2022
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Epidemiology
Health Sciences > Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health, Epidemiology
Language:English
Date:1 August 2022
Deposited On:14 Sep 2022 07:53
Last Modified:15 Sep 2022 20:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0749-3797
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2022.06.017
PubMed ID:35985899
Project Information:
  • : FunderSwiss National Science Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title

Download

Hybrid Open Access

Download PDF  'Longer-Term Efficacy of a Digital Life-Skills Training for Substance Use Prevention'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 717kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)