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Vertical ridge augmentation feasibility using unfixed collagen membranes and particulate bone substitutes: A 1- to 7-year retrospective single-cohort observational study


Lee, Jung-Seok; Park, Jin-Young; Chung, Hye-Min; Song, Young Woo; Strauss, Franz-Josef (2022). Vertical ridge augmentation feasibility using unfixed collagen membranes and particulate bone substitutes: A 1- to 7-year retrospective single-cohort observational study. Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, 24(3):372-381.

Abstract

AIM
To determine whether vertical ridge augmentation (VRA) can be obtained through guided bone regeneration (GBR) using exclusively resorbable collagen membranes and particulate bone substitutes without additional stabilization.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
This study retrospectively examined 22 participants who underwent VRA with staged or simultaneous implant placement. The vertical defects of all participants were filled with particulate bone substitutes and covered with resorbable collagen membranes. The augmented sites were stabilized with unfixed collagen membranes and the flap without any additional fixation. The augmented tissue height was assessed using cone-beam computed tomography at baseline, immediately after surgery, and at annual follow-ups.
RESULTS
The vertical bone gain of the 22 augmented sites amounted to 6.48 ± 2.19 mm (mean ± SD) immediately after surgery and 5.78 ± 1.72 mm at 1- to 7-year follow-up. Of the 22 augmented sites, 18 exhibited changes of less than 1 mm, while the other 4 showed changes of greater than 1 mm. Histological observation of three representative cases revealed new bone apposition on the remaining material.
CONCLUSION
The present findings indicate that GBR procedures using exclusively collagen membranes and particulate biomaterials without any additional fixation are feasible options for VRA.

Abstract

AIM
To determine whether vertical ridge augmentation (VRA) can be obtained through guided bone regeneration (GBR) using exclusively resorbable collagen membranes and particulate bone substitutes without additional stabilization.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
This study retrospectively examined 22 participants who underwent VRA with staged or simultaneous implant placement. The vertical defects of all participants were filled with particulate bone substitutes and covered with resorbable collagen membranes. The augmented sites were stabilized with unfixed collagen membranes and the flap without any additional fixation. The augmented tissue height was assessed using cone-beam computed tomography at baseline, immediately after surgery, and at annual follow-ups.
RESULTS
The vertical bone gain of the 22 augmented sites amounted to 6.48 ± 2.19 mm (mean ± SD) immediately after surgery and 5.78 ± 1.72 mm at 1- to 7-year follow-up. Of the 22 augmented sites, 18 exhibited changes of less than 1 mm, while the other 4 showed changes of greater than 1 mm. Histological observation of three representative cases revealed new bone apposition on the remaining material.
CONCLUSION
The present findings indicate that GBR procedures using exclusively collagen membranes and particulate biomaterials without any additional fixation are feasible options for VRA.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Reconstructive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Oral Surgery
Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Language:English
Date:June 2022
Deposited On:21 Sep 2022 15:37
Last Modified:20 Jun 2024 03:45
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1523-0899
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/cid.13084
PubMed ID:35324059
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)