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Gender differences in cross-informant discrepancies in aggressive and prosocial behavior: A latent difference score analysis


Murray, Aja Louise; Nivette, Amy; Obsuth, Ingrid; Hafetz Mirman, Jessica; Mirman, Daniel; Ribeaud, Denis; Eisner, Manuel (2022). Gender differences in cross-informant discrepancies in aggressive and prosocial behavior: A latent difference score analysis. Psychological Assessment, 34(5):409-418.

Abstract

Cross-informant discrepancies (CIDs) in youth behavior are common. Given that these same behaviors often show or are perceived to show gender differences, it is important to understand how informant perceptions and their discrepancies are affected by gender. In n = 1,048 (51% male) Grade 5 (age 11) Swiss youth, self- versus teacher (n = 261) CIDs were explored using latent difference score (LDS) modeling. CIDs in prosociality (β = -.15) and aggression (β = .14) were predicted by child gender after adjusting for a range of covariates. Males reported more aggression than was attributed to them by teachers whereas females reported less aggression than was attributed to them. Both genders reported more prosociality than was attributed to them, with a larger discrepancy for males. Accounting for gender-related informant differences could help improve assessments used to ascertain whether clinically significant problems are present.

Abstract

Cross-informant discrepancies (CIDs) in youth behavior are common. Given that these same behaviors often show or are perceived to show gender differences, it is important to understand how informant perceptions and their discrepancies are affected by gender. In n = 1,048 (51% male) Grade 5 (age 11) Swiss youth, self- versus teacher (n = 261) CIDs were explored using latent difference score (LDS) modeling. CIDs in prosociality (β = -.15) and aggression (β = .14) were predicted by child gender after adjusting for a range of covariates. Males reported more aggression than was attributed to them by teachers whereas females reported less aggression than was attributed to them. Both genders reported more prosociality than was attributed to them, with a larger discrepancy for males. Accounting for gender-related informant differences could help improve assessments used to ascertain whether clinically significant problems are present.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
06 Faculty of Arts > Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Clinical Psychology
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychiatry and Mental health, Clinical Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 May 2022
Deposited On:10 Feb 2023 15:38
Last Modified:28 May 2024 01:40
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:1040-3590
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0001091
PubMed ID:35175073
Project Information:
  • : FunderJacobs Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderSwiss National Science Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • Content: Accepted Version
  • Language: English