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Crossbred Sows Fed a Western Diet during Pre-Gestation, Gestation, Lactation, and Post-Lactation Periods Develop Signs of Lean Metabolic Syndrome That Are Partially Attenuated by Spirulina Supplementation


Lugarà, R; Renner, S; Wolf, Eckhard; Liesegang, Annette; Bruckmaier, R; Giller, Katrin (2022). Crossbred Sows Fed a Western Diet during Pre-Gestation, Gestation, Lactation, and Post-Lactation Periods Develop Signs of Lean Metabolic Syndrome That Are Partially Attenuated by Spirulina Supplementation. Nutrients, 14(17):3574.

Abstract

Excessive dietary intake of fats and sugars ("Western diet", WD) is one of the leading causes of obesity. The consumption of the microalga Arthrospira platensis (spirulina, Sp) is increasing due to its presumed health benefits. Both WD and Sp are also consumed by pregnant and breastfeeding women. This study investigated if gestating and lactating domestic pigs are an appropriate model for WD-induced metabolic disturbances similar to those observed in humans and if Sp supplementation may attenuate any of these adverse effects. Pigs were fed a WD high in fat, sugars, and cholesterol or a control diet. Half of the animals per diet group were supplemented with 20 g Sp per day. The WD did not increase body weight or adipose tissue accumulation but led to metabolic impairments such as higher cholesterol concentration in plasma, lower IGF1 plasma levels, and signs of hepatic damage compared to the control group. Spirulina supplementation could not reduce all the metabolic impairments observed in WD-fed animals. These findings indicate limited suitability of gestating and lactating domestic pigs as a model for WD but a certain potential of low-dose Sp supplementation to partially attenuate negative WD effects.

Abstract

Excessive dietary intake of fats and sugars ("Western diet", WD) is one of the leading causes of obesity. The consumption of the microalga Arthrospira platensis (spirulina, Sp) is increasing due to its presumed health benefits. Both WD and Sp are also consumed by pregnant and breastfeeding women. This study investigated if gestating and lactating domestic pigs are an appropriate model for WD-induced metabolic disturbances similar to those observed in humans and if Sp supplementation may attenuate any of these adverse effects. Pigs were fed a WD high in fat, sugars, and cholesterol or a control diet. Half of the animals per diet group were supplemented with 20 g Sp per day. The WD did not increase body weight or adipose tissue accumulation but led to metabolic impairments such as higher cholesterol concentration in plasma, lower IGF1 plasma levels, and signs of hepatic damage compared to the control group. Spirulina supplementation could not reduce all the metabolic impairments observed in WD-fed animals. These findings indicate limited suitability of gestating and lactating domestic pigs as a model for WD but a certain potential of low-dose Sp supplementation to partially attenuate negative WD effects.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Animal Nutrition
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Food Science
Health Sciences > Nutrition and Dietetics
Language:English
Date:30 August 2022
Deposited On:20 Oct 2022 15:06
Last Modified:28 Mar 2024 02:39
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2072-6643
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14173574
PubMed ID:36079836
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)