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Pseudomonas putida mediates bacterial killing, biofilm invasion and biocontrol with a type IVB secretion system


Purtschert-Montenegro, Gabriela; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Pinto-Carbó, Marta; Agnoli, Kirsty; Bailly, Aurélien; Eberl, Leo (2022). Pseudomonas putida mediates bacterial killing, biofilm invasion and biocontrol with a type IVB secretion system. Nature Microbiology, 7(10):1547-1557.

Abstract

Many bacteria utilize contact-dependent killing machineries to eliminate rivals in their environmental niches. Here we show that the plant root colonizer Pseudomonas putida strain IsoF is able to kill a wide range of soil and plant-associated Gram-negative bacteria with the aid of a type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) that delivers a toxic effector into bacterial competitors in a contact-dependent manner. This extends the range of targets of T4BSSs—so far thought to transfer effectors only into eukaryotic cells—to prokaryotes. Bioinformatic and genetic analyses showed that this killing machine is entirely encoded by the kib gene cluster located within a rare genomic island, which was recently acquired by horizontal gene transfer. P. putida IsoF utilizes this secretion system not only as a defensive weapon to kill bacterial competitors but also as an offensive weapon to invade existing biofilms, allowing the strain to persist in its natural environment. Furthermore, we show that strain IsoF can protect tomato plants against the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in a T4BSS-dependent manner, suggesting that IsoF can be exploited for pest control and sustainable agriculture.

Abstract

Many bacteria utilize contact-dependent killing machineries to eliminate rivals in their environmental niches. Here we show that the plant root colonizer Pseudomonas putida strain IsoF is able to kill a wide range of soil and plant-associated Gram-negative bacteria with the aid of a type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) that delivers a toxic effector into bacterial competitors in a contact-dependent manner. This extends the range of targets of T4BSSs—so far thought to transfer effectors only into eukaryotic cells—to prokaryotes. Bioinformatic and genetic analyses showed that this killing machine is entirely encoded by the kib gene cluster located within a rare genomic island, which was recently acquired by horizontal gene transfer. P. putida IsoF utilizes this secretion system not only as a defensive weapon to kill bacterial competitors but also as an offensive weapon to invade existing biofilms, allowing the strain to persist in its natural environment. Furthermore, we show that strain IsoF can protect tomato plants against the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in a T4BSS-dependent manner, suggesting that IsoF can be exploited for pest control and sustainable agriculture.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Life Sciences > Immunology
Life Sciences > Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Microbiology (medical)
Life Sciences > Cell Biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cell Biology, Microbiology (medical), Genetics, Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Immunology, Microbiology
Language:English
Date:19 September 2022
Deposited On:24 Oct 2022 14:34
Last Modified:21 Jun 2024 03:33
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2058-5276
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-022-01209-6
PubMed ID:36123439
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDCRSII5_186410
  • : Project TitleA New Class of Signal Molecules in Bacteria: Data-Driven Discovery, Mechanism, and Biological Function (Signalinâ��Bac)
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID310030_192800
  • : Project TitleThe role of vesicle formation in biofilm development
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)