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Associations of executive and functional outcomes with full-score intellectual quotient among ADHD adults


Baggio, Stéphanie; Hasler, Roland; Deiber, Marie-Pierre; Heller, Patrick; Buadze, Anna; Giacomini, Véronique; Perroud, Nader (2020). Associations of executive and functional outcomes with full-score intellectual quotient among ADHD adults. Psychiatry Research, 294:113521.

Abstract

Associations between executive and functional impairment, intelligence, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been scarcely investigated among adult populations and lead to inconsistent results. This study tested the impact of intellectual level on executive and functional impairment in a clinical sample of adults diagnosed with ADHD. Participants were recruited in a specialized center for the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD (n=66, mean age=27.9 ± 10.8). Measures included intellectual quotient (IQ, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale) categorized as ≤110 or >110, the continuous performance test (CPT3$^{TM}$), grade retention, educational attainment, and having an activity (job or studies). Participants with a higher IQ had significantly better functional outcomes than participants with a standard IQ: higher educational attainment, lower grade retention, and often having an activity. Participants with higher IQ performed significantly better on all CPT variables assessing executive functioning. Intelligence seemed to work as a protective factor for executive and functional outcomes in a clinical population of ADHD adults and might reduce long-lasting detrimental consequences in life.

Abstract

Associations between executive and functional impairment, intelligence, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been scarcely investigated among adult populations and lead to inconsistent results. This study tested the impact of intellectual level on executive and functional impairment in a clinical sample of adults diagnosed with ADHD. Participants were recruited in a specialized center for the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD (n=66, mean age=27.9 ± 10.8). Measures included intellectual quotient (IQ, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale) categorized as ≤110 or >110, the continuous performance test (CPT3$^{TM}$), grade retention, educational attainment, and having an activity (job or studies). Participants with a higher IQ had significantly better functional outcomes than participants with a standard IQ: higher educational attainment, lower grade retention, and often having an activity. Participants with higher IQ performed significantly better on all CPT variables assessing executive functioning. Intelligence seemed to work as a protective factor for executive and functional outcomes in a clinical population of ADHD adults and might reduce long-lasting detrimental consequences in life.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Biological Psychiatry
Language:German
Date:December 2020
Deposited On:04 Nov 2022 16:03
Last Modified:27 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.113521
PubMed ID:33161177
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