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Distinctive time-lagged resting-state networks revealed by simultaneous EEG-fMRI


Feige, Bernd; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Kiemen, Andrea; Bosch, Oliver G; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Hennig, Jürgen; Seifritz, Erich; Riemann, Dieter (2017). Distinctive time-lagged resting-state networks revealed by simultaneous EEG-fMRI. NeuroImage, 145(Pt A):1-10.

Abstract

Functional activation as evidenced by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI changes or event-related EEG is known to closely follow patterns of stimulation or self-paced action. Any lags are compatible with axonal conduction velocities and neural integration times. The important analysis of resting state networks is generally based on the assumption that these principles also hold for spontaneous fluctuations in brain activity. Previous observations using simultaneous EEG and fMRI indicate that slower processes, with delays in the seconds range, determine at least part of the relationship between spontaneous EEG and fMRI. To assess this relationship systematically, we used deconvolution analysis of EEG-fMRI during the resting state, assessing the relationship between EEG frequency bands and fMRI BOLD across the whole brain while allowing for time lags of up to 10.5s. Cluster analysis, identifying similar BOLD time courses in relation to EEG band power peaks, showed a clear segregation of functional subsystems of the brain. Our analysis shows that fMRI BOLD increases commonly precede EEG power increases by seconds. Most zero-lag correlations, on the other hand, were negative. This indicates two main distinct neuromodulatory mechanisms: an "idling" mechanism of simultaneous electric and metabolic network anticorrelation and a "regulatory" mechanism in which metabolic network activity precedes increased EEG power by some seconds. This has to be taken into consideration in further studies which address the causal and functional relationship of metabolic and electric brain activity patterns.

Abstract

Functional activation as evidenced by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI changes or event-related EEG is known to closely follow patterns of stimulation or self-paced action. Any lags are compatible with axonal conduction velocities and neural integration times. The important analysis of resting state networks is generally based on the assumption that these principles also hold for spontaneous fluctuations in brain activity. Previous observations using simultaneous EEG and fMRI indicate that slower processes, with delays in the seconds range, determine at least part of the relationship between spontaneous EEG and fMRI. To assess this relationship systematically, we used deconvolution analysis of EEG-fMRI during the resting state, assessing the relationship between EEG frequency bands and fMRI BOLD across the whole brain while allowing for time lags of up to 10.5s. Cluster analysis, identifying similar BOLD time courses in relation to EEG band power peaks, showed a clear segregation of functional subsystems of the brain. Our analysis shows that fMRI BOLD increases commonly precede EEG power increases by seconds. Most zero-lag correlations, on the other hand, were negative. This indicates two main distinct neuromodulatory mechanisms: an "idling" mechanism of simultaneous electric and metabolic network anticorrelation and a "regulatory" mechanism in which metabolic network activity precedes increased EEG power by some seconds. This has to be taken into consideration in further studies which address the causal and functional relationship of metabolic and electric brain activity patterns.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Neurology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:15 January 2017
Deposited On:07 Nov 2022 07:59
Last Modified:27 Apr 2024 01:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.09.027
PubMed ID:27637863
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