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Predictive Abilities of the Frailty Phenotype and the Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Frailty Index for Non-Home Discharge and Functional Decline in Hospitalized Geriatric Patients


Stuck, A K; Schilling, Nicolas; Bertschi, David; Limacher, Andreas; Gagesch, Michael; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A (2022). Predictive Abilities of the Frailty Phenotype and the Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Frailty Index for Non-Home Discharge and Functional Decline in Hospitalized Geriatric Patients. Journal of Frailty & Aging, 11(4):387-392.

Abstract

Background: Frailty is increasingly applied as a measure to predict clinical outcomes, but data on the predictive abilities of frailty measures for non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized geriatric patients are scarce.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive ability of the frailty phenotype and a frailty index currently validated as part of the ongoing Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Study based on clinical admission data for non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized older patients.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting and participants: Data were analyzed from 334 consecutive hospitalized patients of a tertiary acute care geriatric inpatient clinic admitted between August 2020 and March 2021.

Measurements: We assessed frailty using 1) the frailty phenotype and 2) the Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Study (SFNR) frailty index based on routinely available clinical admission data. Predictive abilities of both frailty measures were analyzed for the clinical outcomes of non-home discharge and functional decline using multivariate logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC).

Results: Mean age was 82.8 (SD 7.2) years and 55.4% were women. Overall, 170 (53.1%) were frail based on the frailty phenotype and 220 (65.9%) based on the frailty index. Frail patients based on the frailty phenotype were more likely to be discharged non-home (55 (32.4%) vs. 26 (17.3%); adjusted OR 2.4 (95% CI, 1.4, 5.1)). Similarly, frail patients based on the frailty index were more likely to be discharged non-home compared to non-frail patients (76 (34.6%) vs. 9 (7.9%); adjusted OR, 5.5 (95% CI, 2.6, 11.5)). Both, the frailty phenotype and the frailty index were similarly associated with functional decline (adjusted OR 2.7 (95% CI, 1.5, 4.9); adjusted OR 2.8 (95% CI 1.4, 5.5)). ROC analyses showed best discriminatory accuracy for the frailty index for non-home discharge (area under the curve 0.76).

Conclusions: Frailty using the SFNR-frailty index and the frailty phenotype is a promising measure for prediction of non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized geriatric patients. Further study is needed to define the most valid frailty measure.

Keywords: Frailty syndrome; aged; discharge planning; geriatrics; inpatients; predictive value of tests

Abstract

Background: Frailty is increasingly applied as a measure to predict clinical outcomes, but data on the predictive abilities of frailty measures for non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized geriatric patients are scarce.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive ability of the frailty phenotype and a frailty index currently validated as part of the ongoing Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Study based on clinical admission data for non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized older patients.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting and participants: Data were analyzed from 334 consecutive hospitalized patients of a tertiary acute care geriatric inpatient clinic admitted between August 2020 and March 2021.

Measurements: We assessed frailty using 1) the frailty phenotype and 2) the Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Study (SFNR) frailty index based on routinely available clinical admission data. Predictive abilities of both frailty measures were analyzed for the clinical outcomes of non-home discharge and functional decline using multivariate logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC).

Results: Mean age was 82.8 (SD 7.2) years and 55.4% were women. Overall, 170 (53.1%) were frail based on the frailty phenotype and 220 (65.9%) based on the frailty index. Frail patients based on the frailty phenotype were more likely to be discharged non-home (55 (32.4%) vs. 26 (17.3%); adjusted OR 2.4 (95% CI, 1.4, 5.1)). Similarly, frail patients based on the frailty index were more likely to be discharged non-home compared to non-frail patients (76 (34.6%) vs. 9 (7.9%); adjusted OR, 5.5 (95% CI, 2.6, 11.5)). Both, the frailty phenotype and the frailty index were similarly associated with functional decline (adjusted OR 2.7 (95% CI, 1.5, 4.9); adjusted OR 2.8 (95% CI 1.4, 5.5)). ROC analyses showed best discriminatory accuracy for the frailty index for non-home discharge (area under the curve 0.76).

Conclusions: Frailty using the SFNR-frailty index and the frailty phenotype is a promising measure for prediction of non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized geriatric patients. Further study is needed to define the most valid frailty measure.

Keywords: Frailty syndrome; aged; discharge planning; geriatrics; inpatients; predictive value of tests

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Aging Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Aging
Health Sciences > Geriatrics and Gerontology
Health Sciences > Physiology (medical)
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 January 2022
Deposited On:15 Nov 2022 13:11
Last Modified:28 Mar 2024 02:40
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:2273-4309
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.14283/jfa.2022.44
PubMed ID:36346724
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)