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They will hate us for this: effects of media coverage on Islamist terror attacks on Muslims’ perceptions of public opinion, perceived risk of victimization, and behavioral intentions


Zerback, Thomas; Karadas, Narin (2023). They will hate us for this: effects of media coverage on Islamist terror attacks on Muslims’ perceptions of public opinion, perceived risk of victimization, and behavioral intentions. Human Communication Research, 49(3):227-237.

Abstract

While research has intensively studied the effects of media coverage of Islamist terror on non-Muslims, our knowledge about how it affects Muslims themselves is still limited. Following Sikorski et al. (2017), we distinguish between undifferentiated and differentiated news on Islamist terror, i.e., news reports that explicitly establish or deny a link between Muslims or Islam and Islamist terror. In a 1 × 4 randomized experiment, we exposed N = 423 German Muslims to four different news conditions (terror differentiated, terror undifferentiated, criminal act, and a control group). Our results show that Muslims infer a negative picture of public opinion toward their group from news articles about Islamist terror, with stronger effects for undifferentiated depictions. Moreover, this notion leads to an increased perceived risk for the ingroup to fall victim to xenophobic violence. A strong German national identity attenuated the effects, whereas Muslim identity had no moderating effect.

Abstract

While research has intensively studied the effects of media coverage of Islamist terror on non-Muslims, our knowledge about how it affects Muslims themselves is still limited. Following Sikorski et al. (2017), we distinguish between undifferentiated and differentiated news on Islamist terror, i.e., news reports that explicitly establish or deny a link between Muslims or Islam and Islamist terror. In a 1 × 4 randomized experiment, we exposed N = 423 German Muslims to four different news conditions (terror differentiated, terror undifferentiated, criminal act, and a control group). Our results show that Muslims infer a negative picture of public opinion toward their group from news articles about Islamist terror, with stronger effects for undifferentiated depictions. Moreover, this notion leads to an increased perceived risk for the ingroup to fall victim to xenophobic violence. A strong German national identity attenuated the effects, whereas Muslim identity had no moderating effect.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:070 News media, journalism & publishing
Uncontrolled Keywords:Linguistics and Language, Anthropology, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Communication
Language:English
Date:30 June 2023
Deposited On:18 Nov 2022 08:26
Last Modified:27 Feb 2024 02:49
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0360-3989
Additional Information:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Thomas Zerback, Narin Karadas, They will hate us for this: effects of media coverage on Islamist terror attacks on Muslims’ perceptions of public opinion, perceived risk of victimization, and behavioral intentions, Human Communication Research, 2022; hqac030, https://doi.org/10.1093/hcr/hqac030, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1093/hcr/hqac030. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. (http://www.wileyauthors.com/self-archiving)
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/hcr/hqac030