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Multispecies biofilm behavior and host interaction support the association of Tannerella serpentiformis with periodontal health


Kendlbacher, Fabian L; Bloch, Susanne; Hager-Mair, Fiona F; Bacher, Johanna; Janesch, Bettina; Thurnheer, Thomas; Andrukhov, Oleh; Schäffer, Christina (2023). Multispecies biofilm behavior and host interaction support the association of Tannerella serpentiformis with periodontal health. Molecular Oral Microbiology, 38(2):115-133.

Abstract

The recently identified bacterium Tannerella serpentiformis is the closest phylogenetic relative of Tannerella forsythia, whose presence in oral biofilms is associated with periodontitis. Conversely, T. serpentiformis is considered health-associated. This discrepancy was investigated in a comparative study of the two Tannerella species. The biofilm behavior was analyzed upon their addition and of Porphyromonas gingivalis-each bacterium separately or in combinations-to an in vitro five-species oral model biofilm. Biofilm composition and architecture was analyzed quantitatively using real-time PCR and qualitatively by fluorescence in situ hybridization/confocal laser scanning microscopy, and by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of T. serpentiformis led to a decrease of the total cell number of biofilm bacteria, while P. gingivalis was growth-promoting. This effect was mitigated by T. serpentiformis when added to the biofilm together with P. gingivalis. Notably, T. serpentiformis outcompeted T. forsythia numbers when the two species were simultaneously added to the biofilm compared to biofilms containing T. forsythia alone. Tannerella serpentiformis appeared evenly distributed throughout the multispecies biofilm, while T. forsythia was surface-located. Adhesion and invasion assays revealed that T. serpentiformis was significantly less effective in invading human gingival epithelial cells than T. forsythia. Furthermore, compared to T. forsythia, a higher immunostimulatory potential of human gingival fibroblasts and macrophages was revealed for T. serpentiformis, based on mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory mediators interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor α, and production of the corresponding proteins. Collectively, these data support the potential of T. serpentiformis to interfere with biological processes relevant to the establishment of periodontitis.

Abstract

The recently identified bacterium Tannerella serpentiformis is the closest phylogenetic relative of Tannerella forsythia, whose presence in oral biofilms is associated with periodontitis. Conversely, T. serpentiformis is considered health-associated. This discrepancy was investigated in a comparative study of the two Tannerella species. The biofilm behavior was analyzed upon their addition and of Porphyromonas gingivalis-each bacterium separately or in combinations-to an in vitro five-species oral model biofilm. Biofilm composition and architecture was analyzed quantitatively using real-time PCR and qualitatively by fluorescence in situ hybridization/confocal laser scanning microscopy, and by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of T. serpentiformis led to a decrease of the total cell number of biofilm bacteria, while P. gingivalis was growth-promoting. This effect was mitigated by T. serpentiformis when added to the biofilm together with P. gingivalis. Notably, T. serpentiformis outcompeted T. forsythia numbers when the two species were simultaneously added to the biofilm compared to biofilms containing T. forsythia alone. Tannerella serpentiformis appeared evenly distributed throughout the multispecies biofilm, while T. forsythia was surface-located. Adhesion and invasion assays revealed that T. serpentiformis was significantly less effective in invading human gingival epithelial cells than T. forsythia. Furthermore, compared to T. forsythia, a higher immunostimulatory potential of human gingival fibroblasts and macrophages was revealed for T. serpentiformis, based on mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory mediators interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor α, and production of the corresponding proteins. Collectively, these data support the potential of T. serpentiformis to interfere with biological processes relevant to the establishment of periodontitis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Life Sciences > Immunology
Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Health Sciences > Microbiology (medical)
Language:English, German
Date:1 April 2023
Deposited On:01 Dec 2022 10:17
Last Modified:28 Apr 2024 01:39
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2041-1006
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/omi.12385
PubMed ID:35964247
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)