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Neisseria gonorrhoeae Limits Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Development and Infectivity in a Novel In Vitro Co-Infection Model


Onorini, Delia; Borel, Nicole; Schoborg, Robert V; Leonard, Cory Ann (2022). Neisseria gonorrhoeae Limits Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Development and Infectivity in a Novel In Vitro Co-Infection Model. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 12:911818.

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) are the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) worldwide. The primary site of infection for both bacteria is the epithelium of the endocervix in women and the urethra in men; both can also infect the rectum, pharynx and conjunctiva. Ct/Ng co-infections are more common than expected by chance, suggesting Ct/Ng interactions increase susceptibility and/or transmissibility. To date, studies have largely focused on each pathogen individually and models exploring co-infection are limited. We aimed to determine if Ng co-infection influences chlamydial infection and development and we hypothesized that Ng-infected cells are more susceptible to chlamydial infection than uninfected cells. To address this hypothesis, we established an in vitro model of Ct/Ng co-infection in cultured human cervical epithelial cells. Our data show that Ng co-infection elicits an anti-chlamydial effect by reducing chlamydial infection, inclusion size, and subsequent infectivity. Notably, the anti-chlamydial effect is dependent on Ng viability but not extracellular nutrient depletion or pH modulation. Though this finding is not consistent with our hypothesis, it provides evidence that interaction of these bacteria in vitro influences chlamydial infection and development. This Ct/Ng co-infection model, established in an epithelial cell line, will facilitate further exploration into the pathogenic interplay between Ct and Ng.

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) are the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) worldwide. The primary site of infection for both bacteria is the epithelium of the endocervix in women and the urethra in men; both can also infect the rectum, pharynx and conjunctiva. Ct/Ng co-infections are more common than expected by chance, suggesting Ct/Ng interactions increase susceptibility and/or transmissibility. To date, studies have largely focused on each pathogen individually and models exploring co-infection are limited. We aimed to determine if Ng co-infection influences chlamydial infection and development and we hypothesized that Ng-infected cells are more susceptible to chlamydial infection than uninfected cells. To address this hypothesis, we established an in vitro model of Ct/Ng co-infection in cultured human cervical epithelial cells. Our data show that Ng co-infection elicits an anti-chlamydial effect by reducing chlamydial infection, inclusion size, and subsequent infectivity. Notably, the anti-chlamydial effect is dependent on Ng viability but not extracellular nutrient depletion or pH modulation. Though this finding is not consistent with our hypothesis, it provides evidence that interaction of these bacteria in vitro influences chlamydial infection and development. This Ct/Ng co-infection model, established in an epithelial cell line, will facilitate further exploration into the pathogenic interplay between Ct and Ng.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Life Sciences > Immunology
Health Sciences > Microbiology (medical)
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Uncontrolled Keywords:Infectious Diseases, Microbiology (medical), Immunology, Microbiology
Language:English
Date:7 July 2022
Deposited On:08 Dec 2022 16:43
Last Modified:27 Jun 2024 01:42
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:2235-2988
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2022.911818
PubMed ID:35873141
Project Information:
  • : FunderSchweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)