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Promoting visual long-term memories: When do we learn from repetitions of visuospatial arrays?


Souza, Alessandra S; Oberauer, Klaus (2022). Promoting visual long-term memories: When do we learn from repetitions of visuospatial arrays? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 151(12):3114-3133.

Abstract

Repeated exposure is assumed to promote long-term learning. This is demonstrated by the so-called "Hebb-effect": when short lists of verbal or spatial materials are presented sequentially for an immediate serial recall test, recall improves with list repetition. This repetition benefit, however, is not ubiquitous. Previous studies found little or no performance improvement for repetitions of visuospatial arrays (e.g., arrays of colored squares). Across eight experiments with college students and Prolific samples, we investigated which factors promote visuospatial learning by testing all combinations of variables distinguishing between visual-array tasks (brief + simultaneous presentation + a single recognition test) and tasks showing the Hebb effect (slow + sequential presentation + recall test probing all items). Participants profited from repetitions when all items were tested with a recall procedure, but not if the test consisted of recognition. Hence, the key to promote long-term learning is to recall all of the memorized information over the short-term.

Abstract

Repeated exposure is assumed to promote long-term learning. This is demonstrated by the so-called "Hebb-effect": when short lists of verbal or spatial materials are presented sequentially for an immediate serial recall test, recall improves with list repetition. This repetition benefit, however, is not ubiquitous. Previous studies found little or no performance improvement for repetitions of visuospatial arrays (e.g., arrays of colored squares). Across eight experiments with college students and Prolific samples, we investigated which factors promote visuospatial learning by testing all combinations of variables distinguishing between visual-array tasks (brief + simultaneous presentation + a single recognition test) and tasks showing the Hebb effect (slow + sequential presentation + recall test probing all items). Participants profited from repetitions when all items were tested with a recall procedure, but not if the test consisted of recognition. Hence, the key to promote long-term learning is to recall all of the memorized information over the short-term.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Life Sciences > Developmental Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:December 2022
Deposited On:12 Dec 2022 09:33
Last Modified:27 Feb 2024 02:52
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0096-3445
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/xge0001236
PubMed ID:35604708
  • Content: Accepted Version