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Solitary intraventricular tumors in dogs and cats treated with radiotherapy alone or combined with ventriculoperitoneal shunts: A retrospective descriptive case series


Beckmann, Katrin; Kowalska, Malwina; Meier, Valeria (2023). Solitary intraventricular tumors in dogs and cats treated with radiotherapy alone or combined with ventriculoperitoneal shunts: A retrospective descriptive case series. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 37(1):204-215.

Abstract

Background: Intraventricular tumors are rare, optimal treatment is not defined. Symptomatic patients often exhibit life-threatening hydrocephalus. With several months time-to-effect after radiotherapy (RT), increased intracranial pressure is concerning. This increase in pressure can be overcome by ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS).
Objectives: Retrospective evaluation of outcome and complications in dogs and cats with intracranial tumors treated with either RT or VPS/RT.
Animals: Twelve client-owned cats and dogs.
Methods: Dogs and cats with symptomatic intraventricular tumors treated with definitive-intent RT or VPS/RT were included in a retrospective, descriptive case series. Complications, tumor volume evolution, time-to-progression, and survival time were determined.
Results: Twelve animals were included: 1 cat and 5 dogs treated with single-modality RT and 4 cats and 2 dogs treated with VPS/RT. Neurological worsening seen in 4/6 animals during single-modality RT and 2/6 died during RT (suspected brain herniation). All dogs with VPS normalized clinically by the end of RT or earlier. Complications occurred in 4/6 animals, all but 1 were successfully managed surgically. Imaging follow-up in 8 animals surviving RT showed a marked decrease in tumor volume. Median survival time was 162 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 16; infinity) for animals treated with RT and 1103 days (95%CI: 752; infinity) for animals treated with VPS/RT. Median time-to-progression was 71 days (95%CI: 7; infinity) and 895 days (95%CI: 704; infinity) for each group, respectively. Two dogs died because of intraventricular metastasis 427 and 461 days after single-modality RT.
Conclusions and clinical importance: Ventriculoperitoneal shunting led to rapid normalization of neurological signs and RT had a measurable effect on tumor volume. Combination of VPS/RT seems to be beneficial.

Abstract

Background: Intraventricular tumors are rare, optimal treatment is not defined. Symptomatic patients often exhibit life-threatening hydrocephalus. With several months time-to-effect after radiotherapy (RT), increased intracranial pressure is concerning. This increase in pressure can be overcome by ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS).
Objectives: Retrospective evaluation of outcome and complications in dogs and cats with intracranial tumors treated with either RT or VPS/RT.
Animals: Twelve client-owned cats and dogs.
Methods: Dogs and cats with symptomatic intraventricular tumors treated with definitive-intent RT or VPS/RT were included in a retrospective, descriptive case series. Complications, tumor volume evolution, time-to-progression, and survival time were determined.
Results: Twelve animals were included: 1 cat and 5 dogs treated with single-modality RT and 4 cats and 2 dogs treated with VPS/RT. Neurological worsening seen in 4/6 animals during single-modality RT and 2/6 died during RT (suspected brain herniation). All dogs with VPS normalized clinically by the end of RT or earlier. Complications occurred in 4/6 animals, all but 1 were successfully managed surgically. Imaging follow-up in 8 animals surviving RT showed a marked decrease in tumor volume. Median survival time was 162 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 16; infinity) for animals treated with RT and 1103 days (95%CI: 752; infinity) for animals treated with VPS/RT. Median time-to-progression was 71 days (95%CI: 7; infinity) and 895 days (95%CI: 704; infinity) for each group, respectively. Two dogs died because of intraventricular metastasis 427 and 461 days after single-modality RT.
Conclusions and clinical importance: Ventriculoperitoneal shunting led to rapid normalization of neurological signs and RT had a measurable effect on tumor volume. Combination of VPS/RT seems to be beneficial.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Veterinary
Language:English
Date:January 2023
Deposited On:03 Jan 2023 12:21
Last Modified:27 Feb 2024 02:53
Publisher:Wiley Open Access
ISSN:0891-6640
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.16583
PubMed ID:36382395
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)