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Healthcare services relaxing natural selection may contribute to increase of dementia incidence


You, Wenpeng; Henneberg, Renata; Henneberg, Maciej (2022). Healthcare services relaxing natural selection may contribute to increase of dementia incidence. Scientific Reports, 12:8873.

Abstract

Ageing and genetic traits can only explain the increasing dementia incidence partially. Advanced healthcare services allow dementia patients to survive natural selection and pass their genes onto the next generation. Country-specific estimates of dementia incidence rates (all ages and 15-49 years old), Biological State Index expressing reduced natural selection (Is), ageing indexed by life expectancy e(65), GDP PPP and urbanization were obtained for analysing the global and regional correlations between reduced natural selection and dementia incidence with SPSS v. 27. Worldwide, Is significantly, but inversely, correlates with dementia incidence rates for both all ages and 15-49 years old in bivariate correlations. These relationships remain inversely correlated regardless of the competing contributing effects from ageing, GDP and urbanization in partial correlation model. Results of multiple linear regression (enter) have shown that Is is the significant predictor of dementia incidence among all ages and 15-49 years old. Subsequently, Is was selected as the variable having the greatest influence on dementia incidence in stepwise multiple linear regression. The Is correlated with dementia incidence more strongly in developed population groupings. Worldwide, reduced natural selection may be yet another significant contributor to dementia incidence with special regard to developed populations.

Abstract

Ageing and genetic traits can only explain the increasing dementia incidence partially. Advanced healthcare services allow dementia patients to survive natural selection and pass their genes onto the next generation. Country-specific estimates of dementia incidence rates (all ages and 15-49 years old), Biological State Index expressing reduced natural selection (Is), ageing indexed by life expectancy e(65), GDP PPP and urbanization were obtained for analysing the global and regional correlations between reduced natural selection and dementia incidence with SPSS v. 27. Worldwide, Is significantly, but inversely, correlates with dementia incidence rates for both all ages and 15-49 years old in bivariate correlations. These relationships remain inversely correlated regardless of the competing contributing effects from ageing, GDP and urbanization in partial correlation model. Results of multiple linear regression (enter) have shown that Is is the significant predictor of dementia incidence among all ages and 15-49 years old. Subsequently, Is was selected as the variable having the greatest influence on dementia incidence in stepwise multiple linear regression. The Is correlated with dementia incidence more strongly in developed population groupings. Worldwide, reduced natural selection may be yet another significant contributor to dementia incidence with special regard to developed populations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:25 May 2022
Deposited On:09 Jan 2023 10:30
Last Modified:28 Jun 2024 01:37
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-12678-4
PubMed ID:35614150
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)