Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Feelings of loneliness, COVID-19-specific-health anxiety and depressive symptoms during the first COVID-19 wave in Swiss persons with multiple sclerosis


Hoepner, Robert; Rodgers, Stephanie; Stegmayer, Katharina; Steinemann, Nina; Haag, Christina; Calabrese, Pasquale; Manjaly, Zina-Mary; Salmen, Anke; Kesselring, Jürg; Zecca, Chiara; Gobbi, Claudio; Puhan, Milo A; Walther, Sebastian; von Wyl, Viktor (2022). Feelings of loneliness, COVID-19-specific-health anxiety and depressive symptoms during the first COVID-19 wave in Swiss persons with multiple sclerosis. Scientific Reports, 12:17829.

Abstract

The aim of our study was to investigate whether self-reported feeling of loneliness (FoL) and COVID-19-specific health anxiety were associated with the presence of depressive symptoms during the first coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) wave. Questionnaires of 603 persons of the Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Registry (SMSR) were cross-sectionally analyzed using descriptive and multivariable regression methods. The survey response rate was 63.9%. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS). COVID-19-specific health anxiety and FoL were measured using two 5-item Likert scaled pertinent questions. High scoring FoL (2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) (2.06-2.98)) and/or COVID-19 specific health anxiety (1.36, 95% CI (0.87-1.85)) were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Further stratification analysis showed that the impact of FoL on depressive symptoms affected all age groups. However, it was more pronounced in younger PwMS, whereas an impact of COVID-19 specific health anxiety on depressive symptoms was particularly observed in middle-aged PwMS. FoL and COVID-19-specific health anxiety were age-dependently associated with depressive symptoms during the first COVID-19 wave in Switzerland. Our findings could guide physicians, health authorities, and self-help groups to better accompany PwMS in times of public health crises.

Abstract

The aim of our study was to investigate whether self-reported feeling of loneliness (FoL) and COVID-19-specific health anxiety were associated with the presence of depressive symptoms during the first coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) wave. Questionnaires of 603 persons of the Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Registry (SMSR) were cross-sectionally analyzed using descriptive and multivariable regression methods. The survey response rate was 63.9%. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS). COVID-19-specific health anxiety and FoL were measured using two 5-item Likert scaled pertinent questions. High scoring FoL (2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) (2.06-2.98)) and/or COVID-19 specific health anxiety (1.36, 95% CI (0.87-1.85)) were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Further stratification analysis showed that the impact of FoL on depressive symptoms affected all age groups. However, it was more pronounced in younger PwMS, whereas an impact of COVID-19 specific health anxiety on depressive symptoms was particularly observed in middle-aged PwMS. FoL and COVID-19-specific health anxiety were age-dependently associated with depressive symptoms during the first COVID-19 wave in Switzerland. Our findings could guide physicians, health authorities, and self-help groups to better accompany PwMS in times of public health crises.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

9 downloads since deposited on 16 Jan 2023
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Implementation Science in Health Care
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:24 October 2022
Deposited On:16 Jan 2023 09:56
Last Modified:28 Jun 2024 01:38
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-22445-0
PubMed ID:36280696
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)