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Technologies for HIV-1 drug resistance testing: inventory and needs


Metzner, Karin J (2022). Technologies for HIV-1 drug resistance testing: inventory and needs. Current opinion in HIV and AIDS, 17(4):222-228.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV DR) testing is routinely performed by genotyping plasma viruses using Sanger population sequencing. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly replacing standardized Sanger sequencing. This opens up new opportunities, but also brings challenges.

RECENT FINDINGS

The number of NGS applications and protocols for HIV DR testing is increasing. All of them are noninferior to Sanger sequencing when comparing NGS-derived consensus sequences to Sanger sequencing-derived sequences. In addition, NGS enables high-throughput sequencing of near full-length HIV-1 genomes and detection of low-abundance drug-resistant HIV-1 variants, although their clinical implications need further investigation. Several groups have defined remaining challenges in implementing NGS protocols for HIV-1 resistance testing. Some of them are already being addressed. One of the most important needs is quality management and consequently, if possible, standardization.

SUMMARY

The use of NGS technologies on HIV DR testing will allow unprecedented insights into genomic structures of virus populations that may be of immediate relevance to both clinical and research areas such as personalized antiretroviral treatment. Efforts continue to tackle the remaining challenges in NGS-based HIV DR testing.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV DR) testing is routinely performed by genotyping plasma viruses using Sanger population sequencing. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly replacing standardized Sanger sequencing. This opens up new opportunities, but also brings challenges.

RECENT FINDINGS

The number of NGS applications and protocols for HIV DR testing is increasing. All of them are noninferior to Sanger sequencing when comparing NGS-derived consensus sequences to Sanger sequencing-derived sequences. In addition, NGS enables high-throughput sequencing of near full-length HIV-1 genomes and detection of low-abundance drug-resistant HIV-1 variants, although their clinical implications need further investigation. Several groups have defined remaining challenges in implementing NGS protocols for HIV-1 resistance testing. Some of them are already being addressed. One of the most important needs is quality management and consequently, if possible, standardization.

SUMMARY

The use of NGS technologies on HIV DR testing will allow unprecedented insights into genomic structures of virus populations that may be of immediate relevance to both clinical and research areas such as personalized antiretroviral treatment. Efforts continue to tackle the remaining challenges in NGS-based HIV DR testing.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Immunology
Health Sciences > Hematology
Health Sciences > Oncology
Health Sciences > Oncology (nursing)
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Life Sciences > Virology
Language:English
Date:1 July 2022
Deposited On:17 Jan 2023 16:53
Last Modified:29 May 2024 01:43
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1746-630X
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/COH.0000000000000737
PubMed ID:35762377
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)