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The developing impact of verbal labels on visual memories in children


Overkott, Clara; Souza, Alessandra S; Morey, Candice C (2023). The developing impact of verbal labels on visual memories in children. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 152(3):825-838.

Abstract

The capacity limitations of visual working memory may be bypassed by verbal labeling. In adults, labeling increases estimates of both quantity and quality of visual working memory. However, we do not know when children begin to use labeling and whether labeling similarly benefits visual memories of children under and over age 7. We assessed whether children benefit from prompted and spontaneous labeling opportunities, examining how labeling affects the storage of categorical (prototypical) and continuous (fine-grained) color information. Participants memorized colored candies for a continuous reproduction test either while remaining silent, labeling the colors aloud, or saying irrelevant syllables (discouraging verbal labeling). Mixture modeling confirmed that both categorical and continuous representations increased with age. Our labeling manipulation showed that spontaneous labeling increased with age. For the youngest children, prompted labeling especially boosted categorical memory, whereas labeling benefited categorical and continuous memory similarly in the older age groups.

Abstract

The capacity limitations of visual working memory may be bypassed by verbal labeling. In adults, labeling increases estimates of both quantity and quality of visual working memory. However, we do not know when children begin to use labeling and whether labeling similarly benefits visual memories of children under and over age 7. We assessed whether children benefit from prompted and spontaneous labeling opportunities, examining how labeling affects the storage of categorical (prototypical) and continuous (fine-grained) color information. Participants memorized colored candies for a continuous reproduction test either while remaining silent, labeling the colors aloud, or saying irrelevant syllables (discouraging verbal labeling). Mixture modeling confirmed that both categorical and continuous representations increased with age. Our labeling manipulation showed that spontaneous labeling increased with age. For the youngest children, prompted labeling especially boosted categorical memory, whereas labeling benefited categorical and continuous memory similarly in the older age groups.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Life Sciences > Developmental Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Developmental Neuroscience, General Psychology, Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Language:English
Date:March 2023
Deposited On:19 Jan 2023 10:52
Last Modified:28 Feb 2024 02:44
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0096-3445
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/xge0001305
PubMed ID:36201830
Project Information:
  • : FunderCardiff University
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title