Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Biophysical characterization of the first ultra-cyclist in the world to break the 1,000 km barrier in 24-h non-stop road cycling: A case report


Knechtle, Beat; Forte, Pedro; Weiss, Katja; Cuk, Ivan; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Sousa, Caio Victor; Andrade, Marilia Santos; Thuany, Mabliny (2022). Biophysical characterization of the first ultra-cyclist in the world to break the 1,000 km barrier in 24-h non-stop road cycling: A case report. Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine, 9:990382.

Abstract

A plethora of factors determine elite cycling performance. Those include training characteristics, pacing strategy, aerodynamics, nutritional habits, psychological traits, physical fitness level, body mass composition, and contextual features; even the slightest changes in any of these factors can be associated with performance improvement or deterioration. The aim of the present case report is to compare the performances of the same ultra-cyclist in achieving two world records (WR) in 24 h cycling. We have analyzed and compared the distance covered and speed for each WR. The 24 h period was split into four-time intervals (0–6 h; > 6–12 h; > 12–18 h; > 18–24 h), and we compared the differences in the distance covered and speed between the two WRs. For both WRs, a strong negative correlation between distance and speed was confirmed (r = –0.85; r = –0.89, for old and new WR, respectively). Differences in speed (km/h) were shown between the two WRs, with the most significant differences in 12–18 h (Δ = 6.50 km/h). For the covered distance in each block, the most significant differences were observed in the last part of the cycling (Δ = 38.54 km). The cyclist effective surface area (ACd) was 0.25 m$^{2}$ less and 20% more drag in the new WR. Additionally, the mechanical power was 8%, the power to overcome drag was 31%, and the power-weight ratio was 8% higher in the new WR. The mechanical efficiency of the cyclist was 1% higher in the new WR. Finally, the heart rate (HR) presented significant differences for the first 6 h (Old WR: 145.80 ± 5.88 bpm; New WR: 139.45 ± 5.82 bpm) and between the 12 and 18 h time interval (Old WR: 133.19 ± 3.53 bpm; New WR: 137.63 ± 2.80 bpm). The marginal gains concept can explain the performance improvement in the new WR, given that the athlete made some improvements in technical specifications after the old WR.

Abstract

A plethora of factors determine elite cycling performance. Those include training characteristics, pacing strategy, aerodynamics, nutritional habits, psychological traits, physical fitness level, body mass composition, and contextual features; even the slightest changes in any of these factors can be associated with performance improvement or deterioration. The aim of the present case report is to compare the performances of the same ultra-cyclist in achieving two world records (WR) in 24 h cycling. We have analyzed and compared the distance covered and speed for each WR. The 24 h period was split into four-time intervals (0–6 h; > 6–12 h; > 12–18 h; > 18–24 h), and we compared the differences in the distance covered and speed between the two WRs. For both WRs, a strong negative correlation between distance and speed was confirmed (r = –0.85; r = –0.89, for old and new WR, respectively). Differences in speed (km/h) were shown between the two WRs, with the most significant differences in 12–18 h (Δ = 6.50 km/h). For the covered distance in each block, the most significant differences were observed in the last part of the cycling (Δ = 38.54 km). The cyclist effective surface area (ACd) was 0.25 m$^{2}$ less and 20% more drag in the new WR. Additionally, the mechanical power was 8%, the power to overcome drag was 31%, and the power-weight ratio was 8% higher in the new WR. The mechanical efficiency of the cyclist was 1% higher in the new WR. Finally, the heart rate (HR) presented significant differences for the first 6 h (Old WR: 145.80 ± 5.88 bpm; New WR: 139.45 ± 5.82 bpm) and between the 12 and 18 h time interval (Old WR: 133.19 ± 3.53 bpm; New WR: 137.63 ± 2.80 bpm). The marginal gains concept can explain the performance improvement in the new WR, given that the athlete made some improvements in technical specifications after the old WR.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

12 downloads since deposited on 24 Jan 2023
7 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Language:English
Date:11 October 2022
Deposited On:24 Jan 2023 16:39
Last Modified:29 May 2024 01:45
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:2297-055X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2022.990382
PubMed ID:36304551
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)