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Instructing use of an effective strategy improves recognition memory in healthy adults


Bender, Andrew R; Driver, Charles C; Hertzog, Christopher; Raz, Naftali (2023). Instructing use of an effective strategy improves recognition memory in healthy adults. Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 78(3):383-393.

Abstract

Objectives: Age-related memory decrements correlate with metacognitive declines, including knowledge and deployment of effective mnemonic encoding strategies. However, whether imparting such strategy suffices for mitigating memory differences is unclear.

Method: In a longitudinal study of 276 healthy adults aged 18–79 years, we tested associative and working memory, and assessed beliefs regarding mnemonic strategies. Testing was repeated every 2 years, 5 times. Starting with the third occasion, we instructed participants to use an effective mnemonic strategy (sentence generation). Using continuous-time dynamic modeling, we assessed changes in the item and associative recognition, intervention effects, and their relations with age, sex, meta-memory beliefs, working memory, and metabolic health.

Results: Younger age, better working memory, and stronger belief in effective mnemonic strategies predicted better recognition, whereas instructional intervention attenuated associative memory deficits, with some persistence over time.

Discussion: The present findings show merely imparting effective strategies holds promise for mitigating age-related associative memory deficits.

Abstract

Objectives: Age-related memory decrements correlate with metacognitive declines, including knowledge and deployment of effective mnemonic encoding strategies. However, whether imparting such strategy suffices for mitigating memory differences is unclear.

Method: In a longitudinal study of 276 healthy adults aged 18–79 years, we tested associative and working memory, and assessed beliefs regarding mnemonic strategies. Testing was repeated every 2 years, 5 times. Starting with the third occasion, we instructed participants to use an effective mnemonic strategy (sentence generation). Using continuous-time dynamic modeling, we assessed changes in the item and associative recognition, intervention effects, and their relations with age, sex, meta-memory beliefs, working memory, and metabolic health.

Results: Younger age, better working memory, and stronger belief in effective mnemonic strategies predicted better recognition, whereas instructional intervention attenuated associative memory deficits, with some persistence over time.

Discussion: The present findings show merely imparting effective strategies holds promise for mitigating age-related associative memory deficits.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Uncontrolled Keywords:Intervention, memory, metabolic risk, metacognition, strategy
Language:English
Date:4 March 2023
Deposited On:25 Jan 2023 12:35
Last Modified:23 Jun 2024 03:44
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1079-5014
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbac144
Project Information:
  • : FunderNational Institute on Aging, USA
  • : Grant IDR01 AG011230
  • : Project Title