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Combining near-infrared radiance of vegetation and fluorescence spectroscopy to detect effects of abiotic changes and stresses


Zeng, Yelu; Chen, Min; Hao, Dalei; Damm, Alexander; Badgley, Grayson; Rascher, Uwe; Johnson, Jennifer E; Dechant, Benjamin; Siegmann, Bastian; Ryu, Youngryel; Qiu, Han; Krieger, Vera; Panigada, Cinzia; Celesti, Marco; Miglietta, Franco; Yang, Xi; Berry, Joseph A (2022). Combining near-infrared radiance of vegetation and fluorescence spectroscopy to detect effects of abiotic changes and stresses. Remote Sensing of Environment, 270:112856.

Abstract

Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) shows great potential to assess plants physiological state and response to environmental changes. Recently the near-infrared reflectance of vegetation (NIRv) provides a promising way to quantify the confounding effect of canopy structure in SIF, while the difference between SIF and NIRv under varying environmental conditions has not been well explored. Here we developed a simple approach to extract the fluorescence yield (ΦF) by the combined use of SIF and the near-infrared radiance of vegetation (NIRvR). The proposed NIRvR approach was evaluated in multiple ways, including with the seasonal leaf-level steady-state fluorescence yield. Results indicate that NIRvR-derived ΦF well captured the seasonal variation of the fluorescence yield changes, and achieved similar results with the existing approach. Both SIF and NIRvR were derived from the airborne imaging fluorescence spectrometer HyPlant for three case studies to evaluate the impacts of light adaptation, heat stress and water limitation on ΦF. For the light adaptation case study, ΦF over the low-light adapted sugar beet field was about 1.3 times larger compared to an unaffected reference area while the difference in NIRvR was minimal, which clearly shows the short-term photosynthetic light induction effect and the ability of SIF to detect plant physiological responses. For the heat stress experiment, ΦF decreased during a natural heatwave in 2015 in the fields of rapeseed from 0.0150 to 0.0130, barley from 0.0152 to 0.0144, and wheat from 0.0146 to 0.0142 which showed signs of senescence, while slightly increased from 0.0125 to 0.0130 in the corn field which was still in growing. At the water-limited sugar beet field, ΦF first increased towards solar noon and then slightly decreased during the afternoon over the water-limited areas from 0.017 to 0.021 and 0.020, with high temperature and high light at noon. The advantages to use SIF/NIRvR as a proxy of ΦF to detect stress-induced limitations in photosynthesis include that the impacts of canopy structure and sun-sensor geometry on the ΦF estimation are explicitly cancelled, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is not required as input. Finally, our approach is directly applicable to satellite-derived estimates of SIF, enabling the study of variations in ΦF to detect the effects of abiotic changes and stresses at large scale.

Abstract

Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) shows great potential to assess plants physiological state and response to environmental changes. Recently the near-infrared reflectance of vegetation (NIRv) provides a promising way to quantify the confounding effect of canopy structure in SIF, while the difference between SIF and NIRv under varying environmental conditions has not been well explored. Here we developed a simple approach to extract the fluorescence yield (ΦF) by the combined use of SIF and the near-infrared radiance of vegetation (NIRvR). The proposed NIRvR approach was evaluated in multiple ways, including with the seasonal leaf-level steady-state fluorescence yield. Results indicate that NIRvR-derived ΦF well captured the seasonal variation of the fluorescence yield changes, and achieved similar results with the existing approach. Both SIF and NIRvR were derived from the airborne imaging fluorescence spectrometer HyPlant for three case studies to evaluate the impacts of light adaptation, heat stress and water limitation on ΦF. For the light adaptation case study, ΦF over the low-light adapted sugar beet field was about 1.3 times larger compared to an unaffected reference area while the difference in NIRvR was minimal, which clearly shows the short-term photosynthetic light induction effect and the ability of SIF to detect plant physiological responses. For the heat stress experiment, ΦF decreased during a natural heatwave in 2015 in the fields of rapeseed from 0.0150 to 0.0130, barley from 0.0152 to 0.0144, and wheat from 0.0146 to 0.0142 which showed signs of senescence, while slightly increased from 0.0125 to 0.0130 in the corn field which was still in growing. At the water-limited sugar beet field, ΦF first increased towards solar noon and then slightly decreased during the afternoon over the water-limited areas from 0.017 to 0.021 and 0.020, with high temperature and high light at noon. The advantages to use SIF/NIRvR as a proxy of ΦF to detect stress-induced limitations in photosynthesis include that the impacts of canopy structure and sun-sensor geometry on the ΦF estimation are explicitly cancelled, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is not required as input. Finally, our approach is directly applicable to satellite-derived estimates of SIF, enabling the study of variations in ΦF to detect the effects of abiotic changes and stresses at large scale.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Soil Science
Physical Sciences > Geology
Physical Sciences > Computers in Earth Sciences
Uncontrolled Keywords:Computers in Earth Sciences, Geology, Soil Science
Language:English
Date:1 March 2022
Deposited On:27 Jan 2023 16:36
Last Modified:28 Apr 2024 01:47
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0034-4257
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2021.112856
Project Information:
  • : FunderRheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
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  • : Project Title
  • : FunderDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
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