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Contribution of the μ-opioid receptor system to affective disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy: A bidirectional relationship?


Sone, Daichi; Galovic, Marian; Myers, Jim; Leonhardt, Georg; Rabiner, Ilan; Duncan, John S; Koepp, Matthias J; Foong, Jacqueline (2023). Contribution of the μ-opioid receptor system to affective disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy: A bidirectional relationship? Epilepsia, 64(2):420-429.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Affective disorders are frequent comorbidities of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The endogenous opioid system has been implicated in both epilepsy and affective disorders, and may play a significant role in their bidirectional relationship. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between μ-opioid receptor binding and affective disorders in patients with TLE.

METHODS

Nine patients with TLE and depression/anxiety underwent $^{11}$ C-carfentanil positron emission tomography (CFN PET) and neuropsychiatric assessment, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. The normalized CFN PET scans were compared with those of 26 age-matched healthy controls. Correlation analyses with affective symptoms were performed by region of interest-based analysis focusing on the limbic circuit and orbitofrontal cortex.

RESULTS

We observed widely reduced CFN binding potential (BP) in bilateral frontal lobes and striata in patients with TLE compared to healthy controls. In the TLE group, more severe anxiety and negative affect were associated with decreased CFN BP in the posterior cingulate gyrus.

SIGNIFICANCE

In patients with TLE, interictally reduced binding in the opioid system was associated with higher levels of anxiety and negative affect. We speculate that seizure-related agonist-driven desensitization and downregulation of opioid receptors could be a potential underlying pathomechanism.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Affective disorders are frequent comorbidities of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The endogenous opioid system has been implicated in both epilepsy and affective disorders, and may play a significant role in their bidirectional relationship. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between μ-opioid receptor binding and affective disorders in patients with TLE.

METHODS

Nine patients with TLE and depression/anxiety underwent $^{11}$ C-carfentanil positron emission tomography (CFN PET) and neuropsychiatric assessment, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. The normalized CFN PET scans were compared with those of 26 age-matched healthy controls. Correlation analyses with affective symptoms were performed by region of interest-based analysis focusing on the limbic circuit and orbitofrontal cortex.

RESULTS

We observed widely reduced CFN binding potential (BP) in bilateral frontal lobes and striata in patients with TLE compared to healthy controls. In the TLE group, more severe anxiety and negative affect were associated with decreased CFN BP in the posterior cingulate gyrus.

SIGNIFICANCE

In patients with TLE, interictally reduced binding in the opioid system was associated with higher levels of anxiety and negative affect. We speculate that seizure-related agonist-driven desensitization and downregulation of opioid receptors could be a potential underlying pathomechanism.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Neurology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Language:English
Date:February 2023
Deposited On:01 Feb 2023 08:20
Last Modified:29 May 2024 01:46
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0013-9580
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/epi.17463
PubMed ID:36377838
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)