Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

When does working memory get better with longer time?


Oberauer, Klaus (2022). When does working memory get better with longer time? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 48(12):1754-1774.

Abstract

Longer free time between presentation of verbal list items often leads to better immediate serial recall. The present series of three experiments demonstrates that this beneficial effect of time is more general than has been known: It is found for verbal items presented visually and auditorily (Experiments 1 and 2), and also when people engage in concurrent articulation during presentation, thereby preventing rehearsal (Experiment 3). The effect of time is to improve memory most strongly for the later part of the list, contrary to what is predicted from the assumption that time between items is used to bolster memory traces of already encoded items through rehearsal, refreshing, or elaboration. The data are compatible with a ballistic form of short-term consolidation, and with the assumption that encoding an item into working memory partially depletes a limited resource, which is replenished over time. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).

Abstract

Longer free time between presentation of verbal list items often leads to better immediate serial recall. The present series of three experiments demonstrates that this beneficial effect of time is more general than has been known: It is found for verbal items presented visually and auditorily (Experiments 1 and 2), and also when people engage in concurrent articulation during presentation, thereby preventing rehearsal (Experiment 3). The effect of time is to improve memory most strongly for the later part of the list, contrary to what is predicted from the assumption that time between items is used to bolster memory traces of already encoded items through rehearsal, refreshing, or elaboration. The data are compatible with a ballistic form of short-term consolidation, and with the assumption that encoding an item into working memory partially depletes a limited resource, which is replenished over time. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
6 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

196 downloads since deposited on 08 Feb 2023
196 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Language and Linguistics
Social Sciences & Humanities > Linguistics and Language
Language:English
Date:December 2022
Deposited On:08 Feb 2023 14:03
Last Modified:30 Jan 2024 02:43
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0278-7393
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0001199
PubMed ID:36326652
  • Content: Accepted Version
  • Language: English